Economic Anxiety Index®

Here’s how the COVID-19 pandemic has affected Americans’ paychecks and working hours

Our Marketplace-Edison Research Poll looks at how Americans are dealing with COVID-19.

From This Collection

44% of Americans fear they won’t be able to afford food, poll finds

May 7, 2020
Food banks are seeing a surge in demand as COVID-19 pandemic pushes many newly-unemployed toward food insecurity.
Cars line up at a food distribution site for those impacted by the coronavirus pandemic in Inglewood, California.
(Mario Tama/Getty Images)

Crisis cuts many workers’ hours, extends workday for some

May 6, 2020
A Marketplace Edison Research poll found a third have lost hours but 16% are working more.
An employee restocks milk at a grocery store. Some businesses are seeing strong demand during the pandemic and increasing staff hours.
Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Many lack a financial backstop amid pandemic

May 5, 2020
In the Marketplace-Edison Research poll released today, 41% of respondents could not pay an unexpected $250 expense.
People pass by the stock exchange in New York. Marketplace-Edison poll data shows that many Americans can't handle an unexpected $250 expense.
Spencer Platt/Getty Images

There's been a dramatic spike in Americans' economic anxiety

May 5, 2020
A new Marketplace-Edison Research Poll puts numbers to what we've been seeing and experiencing.
Many Americans are scared they won't be able to afford basic necessities after losing income during the COVID-19 pandemic.
Joe Raedle/Getty Images

People across most income groups are more anxious about the economy during COVID-19

May 5, 2020
But those earning under $25,000 are about as anxious now as they were before the pandemic.
Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Younger workers more likely to talk pay with colleagues

Jul 4, 2019
Greater transparency around salaries could help close racial and gender pay gaps but can be tricky to navigate.
A group of business people having a meeting in an office
Grady Reese/Getty Images

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Yelling at work persists despite awareness of ill effects

Jun 5, 2019
Hostile yelling at work is known to decrease productivity and can increase physical and mental illness, but long hours and nasty public discourse are making for shorter fuses.
NBC Universal/Screenshot via Netflix