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Kristin Schwab

Reporter

SHORT BIO

Kristin Schwab is a reporter at Marketplace focusing on the consumer economy. She's based in Brooklyn, New York.

Before Marketplace, Kristin produced narrative and news podcasts for The New York Times, New York Magazine and The Wall Street Journal. She teaches audio journalism at her alma mater, Columbia Journalism School.

Kristin also has a BFA in dance from NYU's Tisch School of the Arts. After performing with ballet and modern companies, she got her start in journalism as an editor at Dance Magazine. Kristin grew up in Minnesota and has been a bit reporting obsessed since watching the '90s PBS show "Ghostwriter" as a kid. Yes, she had one of those necklace pens and a marbled composition notebook.

Latest Stories (509)

The restaurant reservation resale game is on the rise in New York City

May 20, 2024
Ivy Leaguers and industry insiders are grabbing appointments for trendy places and selling them on the online secondary market.
How much would you spend to nab the perfect table at the perfect time at the perfect restaurant?
Spencer Platt/Getty Images

The Dow hit a record high! So what?

May 17, 2024
The Dow hit 40,000, which doesn't necessarily mean the economy is doing well. But it can speak to how certain people think and feel about the economy.
Thursday, the Dow Jones Industrial Average touched 40,000 for the first time.
Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images

A greater percentage of women are working than ever before

May 15, 2024
What's behind the surge in women workers? And will the numbers keep climbing?
Some factors that have increased women's labor participation: a tight labor market, higher wages and more jobs with flexible work-from-home options.
SDI Productions/Getty Images

A cap on credit card fees would hurt department stores most

Apr 29, 2024
Charge cards have become an important piece of the bottom line for department stores, including Nordstrom, Macy’s and Kohl’s.
It's often easier to get approved for a store card than a bank-issued card, but interest rates are higher.
Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

Movie theaters aren't going anywhere, and it's partially due to their weird architecture

Apr 17, 2024
With sloping, concrete floors and huge, windowless rooms, movie theaters are not the easiest properties to convert.
Ticket sales at movie theaters are still down from pre-pandemic times.
Sean Gallup/Getty Images

How fast casual restaurants pick new locations

Apr 16, 2024
"There's a lot of science and a little bit of art" involved in finding the perfect place, a Chipotle executive says.
Shake Shack has cracked the code on scouting locations, says hospitality consultant Talia Berman.
Scott Olson/Getty Images

If the Federal Reserve waits to cut interest rates, will the European Central Bank follow suit?

Apr 11, 2024
Inflation’s up again in the U.S. while the EU is edging closer to its target. That brings the ECB to a bit of a fork in the road.
If the U.S. and EU economies are diverging, the central banks may pursue different policies, said finance professor Bill English.
Kirill Kudryavtsev/AFP via Getty Images

Federal Reserve survey shows consumer inflation expectations holding steady

Apr 8, 2024
Households expect inflation to be 3% in a year. While that’s not up from the previous month, it’s also not down.
For consumers, it's important that the Fed expresses its commitment to getting inflation down to 2%, no matter how long it takes, economist Carola Binder said.
Robert Nickelsberg/Getty Images

In 2023, women's gains in corporate C-suites were reversed

Apr 4, 2024
Women, including CEOs, are sometimes hit harder by unfavorable economic conditions.
gradyreese/Getty Images

A TikTok ban would be bad news for the beauty brands that advertise on it

Apr 2, 2024
A lot of brands don't seem to have a backup plan, says Jordan Holman of The New York Times. The platform is where "they need to be."
These days, TikTok is "the most formidable way that people are selling products," says Jordyn Holman of The New York Times.
Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images