Sean McHenry

Associate Producer

SHORT BIO

I direct the evening broadcast show, where I also produce host interviews. Yeah, I usually pick the music.

What was your first job?

I would do odd jobs like baling hay back in high school. But the first actual paycheck I got was for cleaning an office on the weekends.

What do you think is the hardest part of your job that no one knows?

Computer crashes.

In your next life, what would your career be?

For some reason, I've always wanted to be a band manager for a struggling but vibrantly creative musician.

Fill in the blank: Money can’t buy you happiness, but it can buy you ______.

Health care.

What’s the favorite item in your workspace and why?

My headphones. A multipurpose tool.

 

Latest Stories (210)

After a year on the PPP front lines, a community banker is seeing confidence return

Apr 13, 2021
PPP loans have produced great results, says Seattle banker Laurie Stewart. She's optimistic about demand rising without inflation.
The interior of the Woolly Mammoth shoe store in Seattle, where Laurie Stewart's Sound Community Bank is based.
Karen Ducey/Getty Images

More people are buying art online, but is that making the fine art market more accessible?

Apr 9, 2021
Online art sales doubled during the pandemic, but that didn't necessarily make it easier to break into the art world — as a collector or as an artist.
A visitor stands in front of works by U.S. artist Stanley Whitney at the National Museum of Contemporary Art in Athens.
Angelos Tzortinis/AFP via Getty Images

Education may help close the racial wealth gap, but it isn't a panacea

Apr 8, 2021
Darrick Hamilton, a co-author of a recent study from the New School, describes other ways to address the disparity that hurts Black Americans.
New graduates at Agnes Scott College in Georgia. African Americans need access to capital, Darrick Hamilton says.
Rick Diamond/Getty Images

At this toy shop, the kids are finally coming back

Apr 7, 2021
Irene Kesselman, owner of Ali Cat Toys in North Carolina, describes what she's seeing this spring.
Ali Cat Toys made over 50 Easter baskets, Irene Kesselman said, with "a lot of stuffed bunnies and rabbits and lambs."
Courtesy of Irene Kesselman

At this Detroit framing shop, demand is outstripping supply

Mar 25, 2021
For Eric Vaughn, picture frame demand is up as customers spend more time at home. But can supply keep pace?
"Since we've been back open, it's been pretty busy," said Eric Vaughn. "We've had to kind of change the way we do business, simply because we have people on top of each other."
Courtesy Eric Vaughn

The Suez Canal block could hit 'downstream' manufacturers the hardest

Mar 24, 2021
A container ship blocking the Suez Canal since Tuesday evening underscores the fragility of the global supply chain.
Cargo ships seen in the Suez Canal in 2019.
Khaled Desouki/AFP via Getty Images

For this stationery retailer, it's been a sympathy card kind of year

Mar 23, 2021
A Michigan stationery retailer saw a big sales trend last year: sympathy cards with a "We're in this together" message.
"Our 'Thinking of you' or sympathy cards just took off," Annie Lang Hartman said. "Ours are kind of more cheeky and funny, kind of like 'We're in this together.'"
Courtesy of Annie Lang Hartman

The steel market is hot, but it won't last forever

Mar 16, 2021
Delaware Steel President Lisa Goldenberg talks soaring steel prices and the possibility of a Biden infrastructure bill.
"Suppliers are making steel as fast as they can," Lisa Goldenberg says. Lead times are the "longest they've been in probably 15 years."
Scott Olson/Getty Images

The customs industry navigates port delays, tariffs and uncertainty

Mar 8, 2021
A Pennsylvania customs broker describes how business has changed due to the pandemic and is changing again under a new president
In 2020, there was “no congestion at the port. Everything was coming in early,” says Gretchen Blough. "Now it's kind of the opposite. Everything's a week to two late."
Mario Tama/Getty Images

U.S. productivity plummeted in Q4, and reopening the economy might be why

Mar 4, 2021
The measure fell at the steepest rate in 40 years, but that might not be as ominous as it sounds — if the trend is short term.
Less productive businesses like restaurants have started to reopen, which may be causing national productivity data to decline.
Scott Heins/Getty Images