Amy Scott

Senior Correspondent, Housing

SHORT BIO

Amy Scott is Marketplace’s senior correspondent covering housing and the economy and a frequent guest host of our programs. She's based in Denver.

From 2010 to 2018 Amy was Marketplace's education correspondent, covering the business of education from pre-K-12 through higher ed and its role in economic mobility. In 2015, Amy completed the documentary film OYLER, about a Cincinnati public school fighting to break the cycle of poverty in its traditionally Urban Appalachian neighborhood. The film grew out of the year-long Marketplace series “One School, One Year,” which won a 2014 Gracie Award. OYLER has screened at film festivals around the country and was broadcast on public television in 2016.

In 2012, Amy and Marketplace China correspondent Rob Schmitz won a national Edward R. Murrow award for their investigation of agencies that place Chinese students in U.S. colleges. Their work also won first prize for investigative reporting from the Education Writers Association. Other honors include a 2010 National Headliner Award and a special citation from the Education Writers Association for an investigation of recruiting abuses at the University of Phoenix, co-reported with Sharona Coutts of ProPublica.

Amy joined Marketplace as a production assistant in September 2001, moving in 2002 to Washington, D.C., as a staff reporter. From 2003 to 2010, she reported from Marketplace’s New York bureau, focusing on the culture of Wall Street, and becoming bureau chief in 2008. In addition to leading Marketplace’s New York coverage of the financial crisis, Amy hit the road for two cross-country trips, exploring how Americans experienced the fallout. In 2008, she produced stories for Marketplace’s remote broadcasts from Egypt and Dubai for the “Middle East @ Work” series. In 2009, she spent a month reporting in Germany as a McCloy Fellow. Amy also won a Gracie Allen Award for feature reporting in 2006.

Before joining Marketplace, Amy worked as a reporter in Dillingham, Alaska, home to the world’s largest wild sockeye salmon run. A native of Colorado Springs, Colo., Amy has a bachelor’s degree in history from Grinnell College and a master’s degree in journalism from the University of California, Berkeley, where she studied documentary filmmaking.

Latest Stories (1,562)

How are schools spending federal pandemic relief funds?

Nov 29, 2021
Summer school, tutoring and HVAC replacement are emerging as big areas of spending, says Nic Querolo, of Bloomberg.
Schools are beginning to spend federal COVID-19 relief funds on programs to mitigate learning loss caused by the pandemic.
Michael Loccisano via Getty Images

What would a city "designed with care" look like?

Nov 29, 2021
Writer Alexandra Lange says urban architecture and a “Department of Care” could make residents’ needs and culture a priority.
More benches, public restrooms and services for unhoused people could be part of a care-driven approach to designing cities.
François Walschaerts/AFP via Getty Images

One of the world's largest economic databases turns 30

Nov 25, 2021
The Federal Reserve Economic Database, or FRED, has been an important resource for economists and more for decades. But what's next step for the database?
The exterior of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, which houses FRED.
Courtesy of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

Why this plant nursery drives cross-country to hand-deliver orders: “There's not a lot of wiggle room”

Nov 24, 2021
Rising freight rates and delayed deliveries are forcing a Wisconsin plant nursery to find ways around the supply chain tie-ups.
Knight Hollow Nursery in Middleton, Wisconsin, specializes in propagations of high-value ornamental trees, shrubs and fruit crops.
Matt Cardy via Getty Images

How big a year for the labor movement was 2021?

Nov 24, 2021
An online geographic tracker from Cornell shows there were dozens of strikes that didn't make it into national headlines or government data.
Nurses picket at the Kaiser Permanente San Francisco Medical Center on Nov. 10. Cornell's Labor Action Tracker documents the many strikes and other activities that aren't recorded by the U.S. Department of Labor.
Justin Sullivan via Getty Images

A fire in Baltimore threatens effort to rebuild

Nov 16, 2021
And shows why restoring distressed neighborhoods can be so hard.
Shelley Halstead assesses the damage after a fire burned through a building she owns in Baltimore.
Dena Fisher

An abandoned block is reborn in West Baltimore

Nov 10, 2021
In 2019, Poinsetta McKnight was one of the last homeowners living on her block. Now with seven restored homes, “I’m seeing it come up.”
Black Women Build - Baltimore threw a party in October to celebrate the progress on the block.
Amy Scott/Marketplace

What the demise of Zillow Offers means for the ibuyer model

Nov 4, 2021
As Zillow winds down its home-flipping business, what's next for the industry?
Two Zillow Offers representatives evaluate a home for purchase in 2019. Zillow is winding down its house-flipping operation and, as of late September, has nearly 18,000 houses to unload.
Joe Raedle via Getty Images

Why addressing economic inequality could help build pandemic resiliency

Nov 1, 2021
“Our health is all interconnected and inextricable from the conditions in which we live,” says epidemiologist Dr. Sandro Galea.
 “Most of “health” is about where we live, where we work, where we play,” says public health expert Dr. Sandro Galea. Above, a doctor puts on a mask before speaking to people without homes in San Francisco in 2020.
Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images

Housing advocates fight to maintain place in social-spending bill

Oct 25, 2021
Advocates had high hopes for the $320 billion initially included for housing, but the plan’s funding is being cut during negotiations.
President Joe Biden promotes his Build Back Better agenda in New Jersey on Monday. His plan to expand the nation's social safety net is being pared back by congressional negotiators.
Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images