Amy Scott

Senior Correspondent, Housing

SHORT BIO

Amy Scott is Marketplace’s senior correspondent covering housing and the economy and a frequent guest host of our programs. She's based in Denver.

From 2010 to 2018 Amy was Marketplace's education correspondent, covering the business of education from pre-K-12 through higher ed and its role in economic mobility. In 2015, Amy completed the documentary film OYLER, about a Cincinnati public school fighting to break the cycle of poverty in its traditionally Urban Appalachian neighborhood. The film grew out of the year-long Marketplace series “One School, One Year,” which won a 2014 Gracie Award. OYLER has screened at film festivals around the country and was broadcast on public television in 2016.

In 2012, Amy and Marketplace China correspondent Rob Schmitz won a national Edward R. Murrow award for their investigation of agencies that place Chinese students in U.S. colleges. Their work also won first prize for investigative reporting from the Education Writers Association. Other honors include a 2010 National Headliner Award and a special citation from the Education Writers Association for an investigation of recruiting abuses at the University of Phoenix, co-reported with Sharona Coutts of ProPublica.

Amy joined Marketplace as a production assistant in September 2001, moving in 2002 to Washington, D.C., as a staff reporter. From 2003 to 2010, she reported from Marketplace’s New York bureau, focusing on the culture of Wall Street, and becoming bureau chief in 2008. In addition to leading Marketplace’s New York coverage of the financial crisis, Amy hit the road for two cross-country trips, exploring how Americans experienced the fallout. In 2008, she produced stories for Marketplace’s remote broadcasts from Egypt and Dubai for the “Middle East @ Work” series. In 2009, she spent a month reporting in Germany as a McCloy Fellow. Amy also won a Gracie Allen Award for feature reporting in 2006.

Before joining Marketplace, Amy worked as a reporter in Dillingham, Alaska, home to the world’s largest wild sockeye salmon run. A native of Colorado Springs, Colo., Amy has a bachelor’s degree in history from Grinnell College and a master’s degree in journalism from the University of California, Berkeley, where she studied documentary filmmaking.

Latest Stories from Amy (1,443)

COVID-19

Buying a house is tricky when you can't leave the one you already have

Apr 1, 2020
More realtors are taking up drone photography and virtual tours.
Would you buy a house you've never stepped foot in?
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Homeowners facing lost income from COVID-19 may get mortgage relief

Mar 25, 2020
Renters could also get a break if their landlords seek assistance.
If your mortgage is backed by Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac or the Federal Housing Administration, you may be able to suspend or lower your payments for up to 12 months if you’ve lost income due to the pandemic.
Joe Raedle/Getty Images
COVID-19

Fed takes unprecedented steps to prop up the economy

Mar 23, 2020
For the first time, the central bank will buy corporate and municipal bonds to keep money flowing.
The Federal Reserve's overall goal is to keep money flowing in the U.S. economy.
Mark Makela/Getty Images
COVID-19

COVID-19 stimulus proposals revive stock buyback debate

Mar 20, 2020
The big U.S. airlines spent almost all of their free cash flow buying back their own shares in the last decade. Now they want government aid.
Sen. Chuck Schumer said U.S. airlines are short on cash because "they spent billions on stock buybacks."
Alex Wong/Getty Images
COVID-19

What does social distancing mean for homebuying?

Mar 20, 2020
Packed open houses mean lots of people touching doorknobs and flipping light switches.
People touch a lot of surfaces during open houses.
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images
COVID-19

How the Federal Reserve's "discount window" works

Mar 16, 2020
The Fed's cut to its short-term, emergency loan rate is meant to keep credit flowing to households and businesses.
The Fed also announced a cut in the discount rate in an attempt to stimulate the economy during the downturn caused by COVID-19.
Mark Makela/Getty Images

Why does it cost so much to build new houses?

Mar 11, 2020
We break down one builder's complaint: government regulations.
A new development in Lanham, Maryland, where rowhouses start at $355,000. The builder chalks up about 11% of that price to regulatory costs.
Amy Scott/Marketplace

Bond yields are lower than during the financial crisis

Mar 9, 2020
But that may not be signaling that the economic damage from the coronavirus will be as bad as the Great Recession.
Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange Monday.
Spencer Platt/Getty Images
COVID-19

10-year Treasury yields, at record lows, are still above zero. Not after inflation, though.

Mar 6, 2020
When you factor inflation, investors are actually losing money by lending to the U.S. government.
Real yields on bonds fell to about negative half a percent on Friday. Above, the floor of the NYSE after the closing bell March 6, 2020.
David Dee Delgado/Getty Images

Low interest rates from COVID-19 present a real estate opportunity

Feb 28, 2020
But the uncertainty that's driving those rates down is causing some to have second thoughts.
Cameron Spencer/Getty Images

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