Amy Scott

Senior Correspondent, Housing

SHORT BIO

Amy Scott is Marketplace’s senior correspondent covering housing and the economy and a frequent guest host of our programs. She's based in Denver.

From 2010 to 2018 Amy was Marketplace's education correspondent, covering the business of education from pre-K-12 through higher ed and its role in economic mobility. In 2015, Amy completed the documentary film OYLER, about a Cincinnati public school fighting to break the cycle of poverty in its traditionally Urban Appalachian neighborhood. The film grew out of the year-long Marketplace series “One School, One Year,” which won a 2014 Gracie Award. OYLER has screened at film festivals around the country and was broadcast on public television in 2016.

In 2012, Amy and Marketplace China correspondent Rob Schmitz won a national Edward R. Murrow award for their investigation of agencies that place Chinese students in U.S. colleges. Their work also won first prize for investigative reporting from the Education Writers Association. Other honors include a 2010 National Headliner Award and a special citation from the Education Writers Association for an investigation of recruiting abuses at the University of Phoenix, co-reported with Sharona Coutts of ProPublica.

Amy joined Marketplace as a production assistant in September 2001, moving in 2002 to Washington, D.C., as a staff reporter. From 2003 to 2010, she reported from Marketplace’s New York bureau, focusing on the culture of Wall Street, and becoming bureau chief in 2008. In addition to leading Marketplace’s New York coverage of the financial crisis, Amy hit the road for two cross-country trips, exploring how Americans experienced the fallout. In 2008, she produced stories for Marketplace’s remote broadcasts from Egypt and Dubai for the “Middle East @ Work” series. In 2009, she spent a month reporting in Germany as a McCloy Fellow. Amy also won a Gracie Allen Award for feature reporting in 2006.

Before joining Marketplace, Amy worked as a reporter in Dillingham, Alaska, home to the world’s largest wild sockeye salmon run. A native of Colorado Springs, Colo., Amy has a bachelor’s degree in history from Grinnell College and a master’s degree in journalism from the University of California, Berkeley, where she studied documentary filmmaking.

Latest Stories (1,484)

Who actually gets those low, low mortgage rates?

Oct 20, 2020
Different lenders may offer the same individual wildly different rates and fees.
A construction worker walks through the site of a new house being built in San Marino, California. Housing starts in September were up 11% from last year.
Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

Without more pandemic aid, renters struggle to keep up

Oct 19, 2020
Nearly two-thirds of renters fear being unable to pay.
A maintenance worker changes the lock of an apartment after an eviction order is posted on Oct. 7, 2020, in Phoenix, Arizona.
John Moore/Getty Images

The pandemic is affecting why and where we move

Oct 16, 2020
A new Marketplace-Edison Research Poll found the flexibility to work anywhere as a factor.
"Fourteen percent of those that move with us are saying one of the primary reasons was due to COVID,” said Tricia Schuler, marketing director for United Van Lines' parent company UniGroup. Above, a moving crew loads a truck in Manhattan in March.
Dia Dipasupil/Getty Images

The homebuilding industry still needs thousands of workers, and it's looking in new places to hire

Sep 17, 2020
A training program for high school students in the juvenile justice system aims to expand the pool of candidates for entry-level jobs.
A construction worker roofing an apartment complex in Uniondale, New York. Construction, generally considered essential, has continued in the pandemic.
Al Bello/Getty Images

How homeowners have gained a financial advantage during the pandemic

Sep 10, 2020
During the Great Recession, owning a house could sink you. Now, it's a life raft.
A house for sale in South Pasadena, California, in April. Home owners have several advantages during the pandemic.
Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

Talk to kids about money, and remember, they "eat up honesty"

Sep 7, 2020
Shipra Parikh, a clinical social worker, explains why these conversations should be tailored to each families personal financial situation.
Leo Patrizi/Getty Images

Millions of homeowners could still save by refinancing

Sep 4, 2020
The hassle isn't the only thing stopping them.
A residential neighborhood in Las Vegas. Nearly 18 million people could refinance their mortgages at lower rates, a mortgage data firm estimates.
Ethan Miller/Getty Images

Weighted blanket makers say they have our anxiety covered

Sep 1, 2020
If one consumer product could sum up our collective anxiety, this might be it.
The U.S. market for weighted blankets is about $220 million a year, but it's just a slice of a much bigger sleep market.
Gorodenkoff/Getty Images

Home prices keep rising in the pandemic

Aug 25, 2020
But low interest rates soften the blow.
A house for sale in Arlington, Virginia, in May. Thanks to low interest rates, affordability has improved in many locales in the U.S.
Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

Rents are falling in some cities

Aug 19, 2020
But the flight to the suburbs may be overblown.
An apartment rental sign in Los Angeles, where prices are sliding.
Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images