Amy Scott

Senior Correspondent, Housing

SHORT BIO

Amy Scott is Marketplace’s senior correspondent covering housing and the economy and a frequent guest host of our programs. She's based in Baltimore.

From 2010 to 2018 Amy was Marketplace's education correspondent, covering the business of education from pre-K-12 through higher ed and its role in economic mobility. In 2015, Amy completed the documentary film OYLER, about a Cincinnati public school fighting to break the cycle of poverty in its traditionally Urban Appalachian neighborhood. The film grew out of the year-long Marketplace<em> </em>series “One School, One Year,” which won a 2014 Gracie Award. OYLER has screened at film festivals around the country and was broadcast on public television in 2016.

In 2012, Amy and<em> </em>Marketplace<em> </em>China correspondent Rob Schmitz won a national Edward R. Murrow award for their investigation of agencies that place Chinese students in U.S. colleges. Their work also won first prize for investigative reporting from the Education Writers Association. Other honors include a 2010 National Headliner Award and a special citation from the Education Writers Association for an investigation of recruiting abuses at the University of Phoenix, co-reported with Sharona Coutts of ProPublica.

Amy joined Marketplace as a production assistant in September 2001, moving in 2002 to Washington, D.C., as a staff reporter. From 2003 to 2010, she reported from Marketplace’s New York bureau, focusing on the culture of Wall Street, and becoming bureau chief in 2008. In addition to leading Marketplace’s New York coverage of the financial crisis, Amy hit the road for two cross-country trips, exploring how Americans experienced the fallout. In 2008, she produced stories for Marketplace’s remote broadcasts from Egypt and Dubai for the “Middle East @ Work” series. In 2009, she spent a month reporting in Germany as a McCloy Fellow. Amy also won a Gracie Allen Award for feature reporting in 2006.

Before joining Marketplace, Amy worked as a reporter in Dillingham, Alaska, home to the world’s largest wild sockeye salmon run. A native of Colorado Springs, Colo., Amy has a bachelor’s degree in history from Grinnell College and a master’s degree in journalism from the University of California, Berkeley, where she studied documentary filmmaking.

Latest Stories (1,601)

Even as the housing market cools, luring discouraged buyers back may be a challenge

Sep 13, 2022
Prices may be coming down and houses are on the market longer, but many potential buyers have given up.
Sellers are "not only getting realistic about their asking price, but they're also having to get realistic about doing repairs," says LaTisha Grant of the TAS Realty Group in Houston.
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

China's lockdowns continue to disrupt personal lives and the global economy

Sep 12, 2022
"There was a convenience shop owner nearby me who ate nothing but instant noodles for weeks," says Marketplace's Jennifer Pak.
A guard wears protective clothing as he stands next to a barrier fence outside a Beijing apartment under lockdown in June.
Kevin Frayer/Getty Images

Why buy now, pay later might not be such a good idea

Sep 12, 2022
These short-term credit companies are running into questions about their customers' ability to pay them back. Regulators are paying more attention.
"You buy more stuff when you're doing buy now, pay later because it feels like you're spending less money," says Vox reporter Emily Stewart.
Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Some homebuilders are dropping prices as mortgage rates rise, economist says

People "desperately want to purchase," but are stepping out of the difficult market, says Ali Wolf, chief economist at Zonda.
"It's a very tricky thing because the builders are trying to drum up demand, while also trying to keep their buyers in backlog — those that have already signed a contract — happy," says Ali Wolf, chief economist at Zonda.
Chris Delmas/AFP via Getty Images

TikTok has a problem with paid ads going undisclosed

Jul 14, 2022
The FTC requires social media influencers to clearly disclose paid advertisements, but not everyone does.
Regulating whether content creators are properly disclosing paid ads is an "impossible job," said Sara Morrison, a senior reporter for Recode at Vox.
Mario Tama/Getty Images

Why the U.S. doesn't have the best sunscreens in the world

Jul 13, 2022
The FDA hasn't approved ingredients that could make products more pleasing to use — and used more often, says Amanda Mull of The Atlantic.
People may be less likely to use sunscreen when it feels sticky, goopy or greasy, or leaves a white cast.
Mykola Sosiukin/Getty Images

As real estate market changes, broker counsels buyers and sellers to think different

Jul 4, 2022
For buyers, the competition is less fierce, but some sellers still have "pie in the sky" hopes.
The median sale price was $407,600 in May, and mortgage rates have climbed. Some would-be buyers are finding the market less affordable, yet sellers have lost some leverage, says Amanda Pohlman of Keller Williams in Cleveland.
Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Rumors of the death of the American mall may have been greatly exaggerated

Jun 27, 2022
In a new book, design critic Alexandra Lange describes how design played a major role in the shopping mall’s successes and failures.
Older malls that are dead or dying may offer communities and cities the chance to rethink the use of public space.
H. Armstrong Roberts/Retrofile via Getty Images

A UN report says making cities more population-dense can help cut carbon emissions

May 2, 2022
Cities were responsible for over half of the world's carbon emissions in recent years. They could turn that around in the decades to come.
An aerial view of a "green" roof in Caracas, Venezuela. Green roofs are roofs that incorporate vegetation.
Yuri Cortez/AFP via Getty Images

Homeowner groups are trying to stop investors from buying up homes

Apr 20, 2022
Investor purchases made up more than 1 in 5 home sales in December, according to CoreLogic.
According to the National Association of Realtors, sales of existing homes dropped 2.7% in March from the previous month and 4.5% from March 2021.
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images