Amy Scott

Senior Correspondent, Housing

SHORT BIO

Amy Scott is Marketplace’s senior correspondent covering housing and the economy and a frequent guest host of our programs. She's based in Denver.

From 2010 to 2018 Amy was Marketplace's education correspondent, covering the business of education from pre-K-12 through higher ed and its role in economic mobility. In 2015, Amy completed the documentary film OYLER, about a Cincinnati public school fighting to break the cycle of poverty in its traditionally Urban Appalachian neighborhood. The film grew out of the year-long Marketplace series “One School, One Year,” which won a 2014 Gracie Award. OYLER has screened at film festivals around the country and was broadcast on public television in 2016.

In 2012, Amy and Marketplace China correspondent Rob Schmitz won a national Edward R. Murrow award for their investigation of agencies that place Chinese students in U.S. colleges. Their work also won first prize for investigative reporting from the Education Writers Association. Other honors include a 2010 National Headliner Award and a special citation from the Education Writers Association for an investigation of recruiting abuses at the University of Phoenix, co-reported with Sharona Coutts of ProPublica.

Amy joined Marketplace as a production assistant in September 2001, moving in 2002 to Washington, D.C., as a staff reporter. From 2003 to 2010, she reported from Marketplace’s New York bureau, focusing on the culture of Wall Street, and becoming bureau chief in 2008. In addition to leading Marketplace’s New York coverage of the financial crisis, Amy hit the road for two cross-country trips, exploring how Americans experienced the fallout. In 2008, she produced stories for Marketplace’s remote broadcasts from Egypt and Dubai for the “Middle East @ Work” series. In 2009, she spent a month reporting in Germany as a McCloy Fellow. Amy also won a Gracie Allen Award for feature reporting in 2006.

Before joining Marketplace, Amy worked as a reporter in Dillingham, Alaska, home to the world’s largest wild sockeye salmon run. A native of Colorado Springs, Colo., Amy has a bachelor’s degree in history from Grinnell College and a master’s degree in journalism from the University of California, Berkeley, where she studied documentary filmmaking.

Latest Stories (1,470)

Why can’t Baltimore solve its vacant housing problem?

Jul 8, 2020
Despite thousands of demolitions and rehabs, the number of empty buildings has barely budged for a decade.
A vacant house is for sale on North Payson Street in Baltimore. In 2016, an abandoned building down the block collapsed and killed a man.
Amy Scott/Marketplace

Homeowners had amassed record equity as crisis began

Jul 6, 2020
Housing wealth and other protections advantage owners over renters.
A neighborhood in San Francisco. Home values have only kept rising as buyers compete for a limited supply of houses.
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images
The National Gallery of Art in Washington is currently closed due to the COVID-19 pandemic.
Nicholas Kamm/AFP via Getty Images

Black applicants are more likely to be denied mortgages, study finds

Jun 26, 2020
And that's one reason for the persistent homeownership gap.
A house for sale in Seattle. Black homeownership rose slightly in 2019, but mortgage denial rates were still much higher — 16% for Black applicants compared to 7% for white borrowers.
Stephen Brashear/Getty Images for Redfin

Despite economic downturn, home prices haven't come down much

Jun 22, 2020
Demand is still outstripping housing supply.
The number of homes for sale is down 17% from this time last year.
Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

In Tulsa, evictions were a crisis even before the pandemic

Jun 19, 2020
A new effort taps behavioral science to keep more renters in their homes.
During a Juneteenth march in Tulsa, Oklahoma, on Friday, people carry an empty, flag-draped casket to symbolize the destruction of Black Wall Street in the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre.
Win McNamee/Getty Images

Mortgages in forbearance drop for the first time since March

Jun 8, 2020
But not everyone who needs relief may be getting it.
Ian Waldie/Getty Images

This Black-owned restaurant couldn't get PPP funding at first. Here's how it's doing now.

Jun 8, 2020
Terence Dickson isn't opening for outdoor dining at Terra Cafe just yet, even if it might cost him some business.
Terence Dickson stands in front of "Big Blue," a delivery truck he's converted into an outdoor bar at his restaurant in Baltimore.
Amy Scott/Marketplace
A house being built in Phoenix. Residential construction fell 4.5% in May due to the COVID-19 pandemic.
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

For one Denver couple, home is a 25-foot RV

May 26, 2020
They wanted to save money and live more simply. Then came quarantine.
Rebecca and Michael Nunziato live in an RV in Denver, with a cat, dog and hedgehog.
Courtesy Michael and Rebecca Nunziato