Amy Scott

Senior Correspondent, Housing

SHORT BIO

Amy Scott is Marketplace’s senior correspondent covering housing and the economy and a frequent guest host of our programs. She's based in Denver.

From 2010 to 2018 Amy was Marketplace's education correspondent, covering the business of education from pre-K-12 through higher ed and its role in economic mobility. In 2015, Amy completed the documentary film OYLER, about a Cincinnati public school fighting to break the cycle of poverty in its traditionally Urban Appalachian neighborhood. The film grew out of the year-long Marketplace series “One School, One Year,” which won a 2014 Gracie Award. OYLER has screened at film festivals around the country and was broadcast on public television in 2016.

In 2012, Amy and Marketplace China correspondent Rob Schmitz won a national Edward R. Murrow award for their investigation of agencies that place Chinese students in U.S. colleges. Their work also won first prize for investigative reporting from the Education Writers Association. Other honors include a 2010 National Headliner Award and a special citation from the Education Writers Association for an investigation of recruiting abuses at the University of Phoenix, co-reported with Sharona Coutts of ProPublica.

Amy joined Marketplace as a production assistant in September 2001, moving in 2002 to Washington, D.C., as a staff reporter. From 2003 to 2010, she reported from Marketplace’s New York bureau, focusing on the culture of Wall Street, and becoming bureau chief in 2008. In addition to leading Marketplace’s New York coverage of the financial crisis, Amy hit the road for two cross-country trips, exploring how Americans experienced the fallout. In 2008, she produced stories for Marketplace’s remote broadcasts from Egypt and Dubai for the “Middle East @ Work” series. In 2009, she spent a month reporting in Germany as a McCloy Fellow. Amy also won a Gracie Allen Award for feature reporting in 2006.

Before joining Marketplace, Amy worked as a reporter in Dillingham, Alaska, home to the world’s largest wild sockeye salmon run. A native of Colorado Springs, Colo., Amy has a bachelor’s degree in history from Grinnell College and a master’s degree in journalism from the University of California, Berkeley, where she studied documentary filmmaking.

Latest Stories (1,529)

As lumber prices soar, reclaimed wood gets a second look

Jun 1, 2021
High building costs have changed the equation for vintage materials.
Max Pollock, owner of Brick + Board in Baltimore, salvages old-growth lumber from vacant houses and industrial buildings.
Amy Scott/Marketplace

Are vaccinations getting people to spend? Maybe not yet.

May 24, 2021
Wall Street Journal reporter Sarah Chaney Cambon notes that unvaccinated people are outspending the vaccinated.
Customers inside a bar in North Hollywood. In order to enter, they must provide proof of vaccination.
Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images

As home prices rise, so does mortgage debt

May 20, 2021
Are borrowers and lenders taking on too much risk?
Most analysts don't expect home prices to reverse in the near term, but if mortgage rates were to substantially increase, the pace of appreciation could slow.
Brandon Bell/Getty Images

Oatly plans IPO as plant-based milk goes mainstream

May 19, 2021
A tour of the dairy case shows the rise of milk alternatives.
Oatly, the Swedish maker of oat milk, will start selling shares to the public on Thursday, in an offering expected to value the company at $10 billion. The market for milk substitutes has been growing rapidly, with Nestle just releasing its own version made from peas.
PHILIPPE HUGUEN/AFP/Getty Images

Could a "love letter" help buyers land a house?

May 13, 2021
Emotional appeals are tempting in such a tight market, but experts say the practice could lead to bias and fair-housing issues.
Buyers are trying anything to score a house in this tight market, including personal appeals and flattery.
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

It's a buyer's market for real estate businesses

May 13, 2021
Would-be homeowners aren't the only ones in the market for some new property.
Big brokerages, like Compass and Realogy, have been on a tear to to buy up their competitors, along with their agents, and expand their range of business.
Chris Delmas/AFP via Getty Images

Spring homebuying season makes a comeback

May 10, 2021
But some real estate brokers think the market may be loosening a little and buyers may be starting to get a little more power.
Listed homes are getting snapped up, but things might be starting to get a little easier for buyers, according to some in the industry.
Chris Delmas/AFP via Getty Images

States passing anti-transgender laws could face economic backlash

May 4, 2021
The corporate response so far has been muted.
Opponents of several bills targeting transgender youth attend a rally at the Alabama State House to draw attention to anti-transgender legislation introduced in the state, on March 30, 2021 in Montgomery, Ala.
Julie Bennett/Getty Images

More homeowners are back to paying their mortgages

May 3, 2021
But the recovery has been unequal. Black homeowners are at a higher risk of foreclosure when forbearance rules expire, one nonprofit says.
Despite recent trends, more than 2 million mortgages are still in forbearance.
Chainarong Prasertthai via Getty Images

Reparations fund will help Black women build houses — and wealth

Apr 29, 2021
A Baltimore church that worked against Black homeownership is now investing in it.
Bryanna Vellines, 28, installs a window frame in an old Baltimore row house.
Amy Scott/Marketplace