Amy Scott

Senior Correspondent, Housing

SHORT BIO

Amy Scott is Marketplace’s senior correspondent covering housing and the economy and a frequent guest host of our programs. She's based in Baltimore.

From 2010 to 2018 Amy was Marketplace's education correspondent, covering the business of education from pre-K-12 through higher ed and its role in economic mobility. In 2015, Amy completed the documentary film OYLER, about a Cincinnati public school fighting to break the cycle of poverty in its traditionally Urban Appalachian neighborhood. The film grew out of the year-long Marketplace<em> </em>series “One School, One Year,” which won a 2014 Gracie Award. OYLER has screened at film festivals around the country and was broadcast on public television in 2016.

In 2012, Amy and<em> </em>Marketplace<em> </em>China correspondent Rob Schmitz won a national Edward R. Murrow award for their investigation of agencies that place Chinese students in U.S. colleges. Their work also won first prize for investigative reporting from the Education Writers Association. Other honors include a 2010 National Headliner Award and a special citation from the Education Writers Association for an investigation of recruiting abuses at the University of Phoenix, co-reported with Sharona Coutts of ProPublica.

Amy joined Marketplace as a production assistant in September 2001, moving in 2002 to Washington, D.C., as a staff reporter. From 2003 to 2010, she reported from Marketplace’s New York bureau, focusing on the culture of Wall Street, and becoming bureau chief in 2008. In addition to leading Marketplace’s New York coverage of the financial crisis, Amy hit the road for two cross-country trips, exploring how Americans experienced the fallout. In 2008, she produced stories for Marketplace’s remote broadcasts from Egypt and Dubai for the “Middle East @ Work” series. In 2009, she spent a month reporting in Germany as a McCloy Fellow. Amy also won a Gracie Allen Award for feature reporting in 2006.

Before joining Marketplace, Amy worked as a reporter in Dillingham, Alaska, home to the world’s largest wild sockeye salmon run. A native of Colorado Springs, Colo., Amy has a bachelor’s degree in history from Grinnell College and a master’s degree in journalism from the University of California, Berkeley, where she studied documentary filmmaking.

Latest Stories (1,601)

"Canceling student debt is the quickest way to narrow the racial wealth gap"

Apr 20, 2022
Proposals to reform the federal student loan system shed light on the relationship between student debt and economic inequality. UCLA's Hannah Appel joins us to discuss.
Borrowers owe more than $1.7 trillion in student loans, and those debts can delay major financial decisions.
Leigh Vogel/Getty Images for MoveOn & Debt Collective

The staying power of Case-Shiller, a marquee housing metric

Apr 6, 2022
It’s not the most timely home price indicator, but it does have advantages, including mapping prices over long periods.
Homes line a Southern California street in 2003. An approach for tracking house prices developed by economists Karl Case and Robert Shiller in the 1980s remains an important market indicator today.
David McNew/Getty Images

Is the "Great Resignation" actually normal for the labor market?

Apr 5, 2022
Bart Hobijn of the San Francisco Fed finds that during fast recoveries, workers often leave companies to join other companies.
Companies in industries like food and retail are rehiring after pandemic layoffs, attracting workers from other employers. That drives up the quits rate, says Bart Hobijn of the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco.
Tim Boyle/Getty Images

Why it's so hard to agree on the causes of inflation

Apr 4, 2022
As inflation hits 40-year highs on several key metrics, not all economists agree on the causes.
Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images)

Businesses are speaking out against anti-LGBTQ laws

Apr 4, 2022
More than 220 companies have signed a letter denouncing laws like Texas' anti-trans law and Florida's "Don't Say Gay" legislation.
Amazon, Apple, CVS, General Motors, Kellogg’s and Starbucks are among the household brands that have come out against anti-LGBTQ laws in various states.
Octavio Jones/Getty Images

Parents of transgender children in Texas face a hard choice: stay or go

Mar 31, 2022
A new state policy threatens families and doctors who provide gender-affirming medical care.
LGBTQ rights' supporters gather at the Texas State Capitol to protest anti-trans legislation in September 2021.
Tamir Kalifa/Getty Images

What happens when a family finally gets off the housing voucher waiting list

Mar 23, 2022
Housing vouchers can change recipients' lives but often come after years of waiting.
Kiarra Boulware with her young daughter, Brooklynn, at their apartment complex in Odenton, Maryland. A housing support program enabled them to move to a neighborhood with better conditions, including an improved educational environment for Brooklynn.
Amy Scott/Marketplace

What the Fed's move could mean for mortgage interest rates

Mar 16, 2022
It's not as simple as you might think.
The Federal Reserve raised short-term interest rates Wednesday, and the housing market is bracing for change.
Saul Loeb/AFP Getty Images

Refugee advocates want the U.S. to do more for Ukrainians fleeing war

Mar 14, 2022
Resettlement agencies say they're ready to help.
Ukrainians board a train bound for western Poland on Monday. The Biden administration has yet to formally welcome refugees to the United States.
Sean Gallup/Getty Images

Mortgage rates fall as investors take shelter in bonds

Mar 9, 2022
But analysts say the dip is likely to be temporary.
After easing last week, mortgage rates may not stay down for long with the Federal Reserve set to raise interest rates this month.
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

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