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Amy Scott

Senior Correspondent, Housing

SHORT BIO

Amy Scott is Marketplace’s senior correspondent covering housing and the economy and a frequent guest host of our programs. She's based in Denver.

From 2010 to 2018 Amy was Marketplace's education correspondent, covering the business of education from pre-K-12 through higher ed and its role in economic mobility. In 2015, Amy completed the documentary film OYLER, about a Cincinnati public school fighting to break the cycle of poverty in its traditionally Urban Appalachian neighborhood. The film grew out of the year-long Marketplace series “One School, One Year,” which won a 2014 Gracie Award. OYLER has screened at film festivals around the country and was broadcast on public television in 2016.

In 2012, Amy and Marketplace China correspondent Rob Schmitz won a national Edward R. Murrow award for their investigation of agencies that place Chinese students in U.S. colleges. Their work also won first prize for investigative reporting from the Education Writers Association. Other honors include a 2010 National Headliner Award and a special citation from the Education Writers Association for an investigation of recruiting abuses at the University of Phoenix, co-reported with Sharona Coutts of ProPublica.

Amy joined Marketplace as a production assistant in September 2001, moving in 2002 to Washington, D.C., as a staff reporter. From 2003 to 2010, she reported from Marketplace’s New York bureau, focusing on the culture of Wall Street, and becoming bureau chief in 2008. In addition to leading Marketplace’s New York coverage of the financial crisis, Amy hit the road for two cross-country trips, exploring how Americans experienced the fallout. In 2008, she produced stories for Marketplace’s remote broadcasts from Egypt and Dubai for the “Middle East @ Work” series. In 2009, she spent a month reporting in Germany as a McCloy Fellow. Amy also won a Gracie Allen Award for feature reporting in 2006.

Before joining Marketplace, Amy worked as a reporter in Dillingham, Alaska, home to the world’s largest wild sockeye salmon run. A native of Colorado Springs, Colo., Amy has a bachelor’s degree in history from Grinnell College and a master’s degree in journalism from the University of California, Berkeley, where she studied documentary filmmaking.

Latest Stories (1,534)

It's a buyer's market for real estate businesses

May 13, 2021
Would-be homeowners aren't the only ones in the market for some new property.
Big brokerages, like Compass and Realogy, have been on a tear to to buy up their competitors, along with their agents, and expand their range of business.
Chris Delmas/AFP via Getty Images

Spring homebuying season makes a comeback

May 10, 2021
But some real estate brokers think the market may be loosening a little and buyers may be starting to get a little more power.
Listed homes are getting snapped up, but things might be starting to get a little easier for buyers, according to some in the industry.
Chris Delmas/AFP via Getty Images

States passing anti-transgender laws could face economic backlash

May 4, 2021
The corporate response so far has been muted.
Opponents of several bills targeting transgender youth attend a rally at the Alabama State House to draw attention to anti-transgender legislation introduced in the state, on March 30, 2021 in Montgomery, Ala.
Julie Bennett/Getty Images

More homeowners are back to paying their mortgages

May 3, 2021
But the recovery has been unequal. Black homeowners are at a higher risk of foreclosure when forbearance rules expire, one nonprofit says.
Despite recent trends, more than 2 million mortgages are still in forbearance.
Chainarong Prasertthai via Getty Images

Reparations fund will help Black women build houses — and wealth

Apr 29, 2021
A Baltimore church that worked against Black homeownership is now investing in it.
Bryanna Vellines, 28, installs a window frame in an old Baltimore row house.
Amy Scott/Marketplace

A Baltimore church grapples with its racist past

Apr 27, 2021
A personal connection to slavery sparked a reckoning that lead to reparations.
Deacon Natalie Conway stands in front of Memorial Episcopal Church in Baltimore.
Amy Scott/Marketplace

Facing bidding wars, more homebuyers are waiving contingencies

Apr 23, 2021
Contingencies allow buyers, under certain conditions, to renegotiate or even back out of a deal without losing money.
Buyer protections are often discarded in the current seller's market, which could squeeze out people who can’t afford a lot of risk.
Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Institutional investors are stiff competition for homebuyers

Apr 13, 2021
A report estimates that 1 in 5 homes sold in the U.S. goes to an institution like a pension or sovereign wealth fund.
The added competition for so few houses is further driving up prices for everyone.
Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Why the nation’s first reparations program for Black residents is tied to homeownership

Apr 7, 2021
The groundbreaking reparations program in Evanston, Illinois, seeks to shrink the racial wealth gap through housing grants.
A Black Lives Matter sign sits in front of a home on March 23 in Evanston, Illinois. The City Council voted to approve a plan, believed to be the first of its kind in the nation, to make reparations available to Black residents due to past discrimination.
Scott Olson/Getty Images

Babies and toddlers are feeling pandemic stress, too

Apr 6, 2021
Myra Jones-Taylor of Zero to Three says children and babies can feel the stress and instability that has come with the pandemic.
Didier Pallages/Getty Images