What have you always wondered about the economy? Tell Us

Meghan McCarty Carino

Reporter

SHORT BIO

I cover workplace culture, from the rise of the gig economy, automation and #MeToo to wellness programs, digital nomads and pay transparency.

What was your first job?

When I was 13, I got a work permit so I could do children's face painting at our local fruit stand/pumpkin patch for about $4 an hour. Full-face sparkle butterflies were my specialty!

What do you think is the hardest part of your job that no one knows?

Because we often turn around stories on really tight deadlines (like a few hours), I'll often frantically reach out to way more people than I need for a story because I don't know who's going to get back to me in time for air. Often, I end up with more interviews than I can fit in the allotted time and I have to leave someone out. I try as hard as possible to use that interview to feed another story, but it's not always possible. Telling people who have been kind enough to take time out of their busy schedule and share their expertise and experience with me that I didn't include them in the final story is the stuff of nightmares!

What advice do you wish someone had given you before you started this career?

Trust your gut. The things that make you laugh or confuse you are often the best, most human way into a story.

In your next life, what would your career be?

I would run tours for off-the-beaten-path travel, not just because I love traveling, but because it is seemingly the only area of life in which I manage to be insanely, supremely organized. While I can't find my tax returns or family members' addresses, when I'm planning a trip, I make color-coded Google maps and spreadsheet budgets, I memorize best restaurant lists and optimize itineraries to hit the maximum number of eating opportunities and happy hours.

Fill in the blank: Money can’t buy you happiness, but it can buy you ______.

Chateauneuf-du-Pape.

What is something that everyone should own, no matter how much it costs?

A Japanese chef's knife.

What’s something that you thought you knew but later found out you were wrong about?

I was one of those annoying people who didn't own a television in their 20s because I was too cool for mass media. Then I discovered “Mad Men.” And “Game of Thrones.” And “House Hunters International.” Now I'm a bona fide TV addict, and I truly believe that experiencing popular TV shows together is an amazing way of connecting with our fellow humans.

What’s your most memorable Marketplace moment?

The first time I used the term "blockchain" in a story. I never thought I would know what that meant until I worked here. Actually, I'm still not really sure.

What’s the favorite item in your workspace and why?

Kleenex. Thanks to allergies, I go through about a box a week.

Latest Stories (246)

Yup, looking at yourself on video all the time can get exhausting

Mar 1, 2021
Stanford researchers say being constantly confronted with our own faces in videoconferencing takes a toll.
"When you look at yourself, you evaluate yourself. And evaluating yourself for eight hours a day is not good," said Jeremy Bailenson with Stanford’s Virtual Human Interaction Lab.
LeoPatrizi via Getty Images

For teachers, pandemic adds new stresses

Feb 25, 2021
A new Rand survey found stress was the top reason why teachers leave the profession, even before COVID-19.
A new report from the Rand Corporation shows the toll stress takes on those in the profession, and how the pandemic has made things worse.
John Moore/Getty Images

New PPP plan aims to level playing field for smallest businesses

Feb 24, 2021
Smaller businesses owned by women and people of color often lack the banking relationships that larger companies have.
President Biden announced changes Monday to the Paycheck Protection Program aimed at helping smaller businesses owned by women and people of color to qualify for federal loans due to the economic impact that has been caused by the COVID-19 pandemic.
Alex Wong/Getty Images

Millennials continue to lag behind in home ownership rates

Feb 23, 2021
Student loan debt, high housing prices and career setbacks from the Great Recession hurt millennials' ability to build wealth.
Millennials are held back from homeownership from economic setbacks like student loan debt and the Great Recession. Above, a house under contract in Washington, D.C., in November.
Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

People who refuse unsafe work can get unemployment benefits

Feb 11, 2021
Until now such decisions have been left to states, leading to wide variation and confusion.
The lack of consistency across the country as to what counts as "unsafe work" means workers are consistently denied unemployment benefits.
Alex Edelman/AFP via Getty Images

Moms with straight As in high school get similar leadership opportunities as dads who got failing grades

Feb 10, 2021
A new study provides more evidence that mothers are particularly penalized in the workplace.
During the pandemic, many mothers have been forced to cut back on their hours or leave jobs to care for kids, often because they make less than a male partner.
Joe Raedle/Getty Images

New viral variants spur calls for better masks

Jan 28, 2021
Front-line workers are especially at risk indoors. Wearing a cloth and surgical mask together is an option to N95s, one doctor says.
Pedestrians wearing face masks walk past a "Prevent the spread of COVID-19" banner in Los Angeles on Jan. 19.
Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

Workers in food jobs at greatest risk of death in pandemic, study finds

Jan 27, 2021
Low-wage essential workers are dying at higher rates. Public health measures and vaccine distribution are needed to protect them.
Research shows the need for public health measures and vaccine distribution to protect essential workers like those on farms. Above, plastic dividers separate workers on a farm in California.
Brent Stirton/Getty Images

Biden executive actions target LGBTQ discrimination

Jan 20, 2021
The president is strengthening workplace protections and rolling back the military ban on transgender service.
LGBTQ rights supporters rally outside the Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., Oct. 8, 2019, as the court holds oral arguments in three cases dealing with workplace discrimination based on sexual orientation.
Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images