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Marketplace Morning Report
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Marketplace Morning Report

Meghan McCarty Carino

Reporter

SHORT BIO

I cover workplace culture, from the rise of the gig economy, automation and #MeToo to wellness programs, digital nomads and pay transparency.

What was your first job?

When I was 13, I got a work permit so I could do children's face painting at our local fruit stand/pumpkin patch for about $4 an hour. Full-face sparkle butterflies were my specialty!

What do you think is the hardest part of your job that no one knows?

Because we often turn around stories on really tight deadlines (like a few hours), I'll often frantically reach out to way more people than I need for a story because I don't know who's going to get back to me in time for air. Often, I end up with more interviews than I can fit in the allotted time and I have to leave someone out. I try as hard as possible to use that interview to feed another story, but it's not always possible. Telling people who have been kind enough to take time out of their busy schedule and share their expertise and experience with me that I didn't include them in the final story is the stuff of nightmares!

What advice do you wish someone had given you before you started this career?

Trust your gut. The things that make you laugh or confuse you are often the best, most human way into a story.

In your next life, what would your career be?

I would run tours for off-the-beaten-path travel, not just because I love traveling, but because it is seemingly the only area of life in which I manage to be insanely, supremely organized. While I can't find my tax returns or family members' addresses, when I'm planning a trip, I make color-coded Google maps and spreadsheet budgets, I memorize best restaurant lists and optimize itineraries to hit the maximum number of eating opportunities and happy hours.

Fill in the blank: Money can’t buy you happiness, but it can buy you ______.

Chateauneuf-du-Pape.

What is something that everyone should own, no matter how much it costs?

A Japanese chef's knife.

What’s something that you thought you knew but later found out you were wrong about?

I was one of those annoying people who didn't own a television in their 20s because I was too cool for mass media. Then I discovered “Mad Men.” And “Game of Thrones.” And “House Hunters International.” Now I'm a bona fide TV addict, and I truly believe that experiencing popular TV shows together is an amazing way of connecting with our fellow humans.

What’s your most memorable Marketplace moment?

The first time I used the term "blockchain" in a story. I never thought I would know what that meant until I worked here. Actually, I'm still not really sure.

What’s the favorite item in your workspace and why?

Kleenex. Thanks to allergies, I go through about a box a week.

Latest Stories from Meghan (59)

Workplace Culture

Recession could sour the kombucha party at WeWork

by Meghan McCarty Carino Aug 14, 2019
The co-working space identified a downturn as a risk as it readies its IPO.
A WeWork location in Shanghai.
Courtesy of WeWork

Nike hopes parents will sign up for kids' sneaker club

by Meghan McCarty Carino Aug 12, 2019
Parents would pay a monthly fee starting at $20 for four pairs of shoes, but how many do kids really need?
People walk by a Nike store in Manhattan in 2018 in New York, New York.
Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Could the gig be up for Uber and Lyft?

by Meghan McCarty Carino Aug 9, 2019
A law under consideration in California would require the companies to classify their drivers as employees.
A woman holds up a sign as people protest outside Uber's corporate headquarters in San Francisco, California in May 2019.
Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images)
Workplace Culture

Lowe's outsources thousands of jobs to third-party contractors

by Meghan McCarty Carino Aug 5, 2019
The hardware retailer announced thousands of layoffs this week, but the jobs aren't going away
Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images
Workplace Culture

States expand bans on asking job applicants for salary history

by Meghan McCarty Carino Aug 1, 2019
The question can perpetuate long-standing pay disparities among women and racial and ethnic groups.
A job seeker fills out an application at a career fair in midtown Manhattan, New York City.
John Moore/Getty Images
Workplace Culture

Why unlimited vacation isn't all it seems

by Meghan McCarty Carino Jul 31, 2019
Research finds employees with unlimited vacation actually take less time off.
Palm trees are silhouetted before the sunset sky at Waikiki beach in Honolulu, Hawaii.
Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images

Protests rock Hong Kong and its economy

by Meghan McCarty Carino Jul 30, 2019
Two months of massive demonstrations could be hampering tourism and international investment.
Protesters are enveloped by tear gas on a street during a demonstration in the area of Sheung Wan on July 28 in Hong Kong.
Billy H.C. Kwok/Getty Images

A bumpy road for Nissan as profits plummet and layoffs loom

by Meghan McCarty Carino Jul 25, 2019
An executive scandal, questionable strategy, and outdated design dragged down the automaker's profits.
Nissan cars are displayed at a dealership on July 25, 2019 in New York City.
Spencer Platt/Getty Images
Workplace Culture

Burnt out millennials turn to binge-streaming TV

by Meghan McCarty Carino Jul 23, 2019
In order to relieve stress, young people turn to streaming media more than exercise, sleep, drinking or drugs.
Jonathan Nackstrand/AFP/Getty Images

Marvel's diverse new superheroes target broader box office success

by Meghan McCarty Carino Jul 22, 2019
The new slate of Marvel films will feature the first leading Asian superhero, deaf superhero and openly gay superhero.
Natalie Portman and Tessa Thompson speak at the Marvel Studios Panel during 2019 Comic-Con International at San Diego Convention Center on July 20, 2019.
Kevin Winter/Getty Images