Marielle Segarra

Reporter

SHORT BIO

As a reporter for Marketplace, my job is to show people how the ins and outs of the economy are relevant to their lives. That has meant explaining things like how a mall closure can gut a town's budget, how drug shortages are making it harder for doctors to treat patients and how a typo in the new tax law is causing retailers to hold off on store renovations. I'm also interested in the psychology behind the economic decisions we make.

What was your first job?

Summer camp counselor to a bunch of 5-year-olds.

In your next life, what would your career be?

I think I would still want to create things. Maybe I'd be a chef. Or an interior designer. Or I'd write for a TV show.

Fill in the blank: Money can’t buy you happiness, but it can buy you ______.

Financial stability, which is a good start.

What’s the favorite item in your workspace and why?

My stash of chocolate.

Latest Stories (318)

Washington's NFL team is dropping its name and logo

Jul 13, 2020
There was a financial imperative for the name change, as sponsors and retailers threatened to pull their money and stop selling team merchandise.
After pressures from sponsors and retailers, the NFL franchise is changing its name.
Al Messerschmidt/Getty Images

Lots of parents hold off on back-to-school shopping

Jul 10, 2020
Because...are the kids even going back to school this year?
French schoolchildren wearing protective gear attend class in May. Will this year's purchases include face masks and hand sanitizer along with notebooks and pencils?
Damien Meyer/AFP via Getty Images

As COVID-19 cases spike, retail enters a new normal

Jul 9, 2020
Retailers are coming to terms with the fact that this virus is going to be with us for a long time.
Shoppers at a reopened Texas mall in May. The current surge in coronavirus cases is bringing new woes to retailers.
Mark Felix/AFP via Getty Images

Restaurants, bars put the brakes on reopening, just as jobs started coming back

Jul 9, 2020
More than 30% of June's job gains came from bars and restaurants.
Restaurants and bars in states where COVID-19 is spiking have run up against new rules to once again cut capacity or certain services.
Ronald Martinez/Getty Images

How some of the 5.5 million businesses that got PPP loans spent the money

Jul 7, 2020
Most of it went to hiring back furloughed employees — or hiring new ones.
A bartender mixes a drink at a Maryland restaurant. PPP loans allowed some bars and restaurants to stay afloat during the coronavirus pandemic.
Alex Edelman/AFP via Getty Images

Secondhand clothing sales are growing during the pandemic

Jul 1, 2020
We took a tour of the distribution center for thredUP, the world's largest resale website.
Used items fill three-level racks in a thredUP distribution center. From here, items are packed and shipped to customers.
Courtesy thredUP

Will hospitals run out of protective gear again as cases rise?

Jun 29, 2020
3M has doubled production of N95 masks, but demand still exceeds supply.
Medical personnel administer a COVID-19 test in West Palm Beach, Florida. As cases begin to rise again, the United States might have an easier time securing personal protective equipment.
Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images

As pandemic worsens, will restaurants need to pull back again?

Jun 24, 2020
Small restaurants are at the greatest risk if put under new restrictions.
A Los Angeles restaurant worker wears a face covering and gloves for handling takeout orders, accompanied by pandemic-safety instructions.
Mario Tama/Getty Images

Here's how companies are observing Juneteenth this year

Jun 19, 2020
Juneteenth dates back to 1865, and it is a celebration specifically of the end of slavery in Texas, which was one of the last holdouts.
This is not a new holiday. But with the conversation we’re having now about racial injustice and American history, companies are paying attention to it.
David Paul Morris/Getty Images

Quaker Oats is retiring the Aunt Jemima brand because of its origins in "a racial stereotype"

Up until now, Quaker hasn't been interested in changing the logo or even acknowledging the history of the brand.
The branding of Aunt Jemima actually goes back to the late 1800s, and was used to evoke a common racist caricature of Black women.
Mike Mozart/Flickr via Creative Commons