Aug 19, 2020

Black capitalism, then and now

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Plus, the story of Soul City, falling rents in New York and San Francisco, and whether college students can expect a tuition refund for canceled in-person classes.

Segments From this episode

How are CEOs doing on their stakeholdlers pledge?

In 2019, some of the country's most powerful business leaders promised to redefine what it means to be a corporation. Then the pandemic hit.
People walk outside the New York Stock Exchange last month. One year ago, a group of nearly 200 CEOs agreed to consider more than just shareholders in business decisions.
Johannes Eisele/AFP via Getty Images

Rents are falling in some cities

Aug 19, 2020
But the flight to the suburbs may be overblown.
An apartment rental sign in Los Angeles, where prices are sliding.
Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

Retailers pledge 15% of shelf space to Black-owned businesses

Aug 19, 2020
The 15 Percent Pledge is pushing retailers to devote more shelf space to Black-owned businesses.
A Sephora store in Santa Monica, California, in March. The beauty chain is participating in the 15 Percent Pledge.
Mario Tama/Getty Images

A food historian’s “ode to macaroni and cheese”

Aug 19, 2020
“We like to curse processed foods,” says Jeffrey Miller. “But we usually do it with a mouth full of them.”
Demand for Kraft Macaroni & Cheese has surged this year as Americans are cooking more and eating at restaurants less.
Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images

Don't expect a tuition refund if your university moves classes online

Aug 19, 2020
Students may not be getting what they signed up for, but they're unlikely to get their money back.
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill moved classes online after more than 100 students tested positive for COVID-19.
Melissa Sue Gerrits/Getty Images

What the story of Soul City, N.C., can teach us about fixing systemic economic racism

Aug 19, 2020
Civil rights leader Floyd McKissick set out to create a town, aided by government funding, that would showcase Black capitalism. Professor Devin Fergus explains why the story is relevant today.
Civil rights leaders including Floyd McKissick, second from left, at the White House with President John Kennedy in 1963. McKissick led the Congress of Racial Equality and later founded Soul City.
AFP/Getty Images

Music from the episode

Pa Pa Power Dead Man's Bones
Confessions Sudan Archives
True Affection The Blow
Mystic Voyage Roy Ayers
Watch it Grow The Everywheres

The team

Nancy Farghalli Executive Producer
Bridget Bodnar Producer
Daisy Palacios Producer
Sean McHenry Associate Producer
Maria Hollenhorst Associate Producer

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