Jan 10, 2017

01/10/2017: Obama’s economic legacy

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Obama is set to make his last speech as U.S. president tonight, with plans to reflect on the past eight years. In the meantime, we'll reflect on his economic record. Next, we'll explore how the possibility of chillier U.S.-Cuba relations in the Trump administration could affect international access to Cuban drugs. And finally, we'll take a look at what the FIFA World Cup's expansion from 32 to 48 national teams means for revenue. 

Segments From this episode

Study indicates millennial workers stay put more than many think

Jan 10, 2017
You may have heard the generalization that millennials – people born between around 1982 and 2000 — are impatient in the workforce, that they hop from job to job, looking for better opportunities. Well, a new report from the research organization The Conference Board, as well as RW2 Enterprises and DDI, finds the opposite – at least among millennials […]

Obama's economy: How did he do?

Jan 10, 2017
In his farewell speech, Obama is likely to list the nation’s highs and lows.
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

U.S.-Cuba relations could be big for pharmaceuticals

Jan 10, 2017
A "refreeze" could jeopardize cooperation on cancer drugs.
Cubans buy medicine in a drugstore in Havana.
STR/AFP/Getty Images

01/10/17: Sneakers as currency

Jan 10, 2017
President-elect Trump has tapped his son-in-law, Jared Kushner, to become a senior White House adviser. But Lyndon B. Johnson signed a federal anti-nepotism law back in the '60s. Will it prevent Kushner from nabbing the position? Historian Joshua Zeitz breaks down how the law came about and whether it contains any loopholes. Next, we'll look at the limited-edition sneaker market, where sellers can make thousands in just weeks.

The resale market for sneakers is red hot

Jan 10, 2017
Some savers invest their hard-earned dollars in footwear.
Sneakers on display at Sneaker Pawn, The Bank for Sneakers in New York.
Sally Herships/Marketplace

Will the federal anti-nepotism law apply to Jared Kushner?

Jan 10, 2017
A look back at the history of the law and whether it'll prevent Trump's son-in-law from becoming a White House adviser.
Jared Kushner exits Trump Tower in New York City.
Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Obama is set to make his last speech as U.S. president tonight, with plans to reflect on the past eight years. In the meantime, we’ll reflect on his economic record. Next, we’ll explore how the possibility of chillier U.S.-Cuba relations in the Trump administration could affect international access to Cuban drugs. And finally, we’ll take a look at what the FIFA World Cup’s expansion from 32 to 48 national teams means for revenue. 

The team

Stephen Ryan Producer, BBC