David Brancaccio

Host and Senior Editor, Marketplace Morning Report

SHORT BIO

I’ve anchored and reported for Marketplace since 1989 from bases in London, Los Angeles and New York. Multimedia journalism’s my thing — been doing radio since I was a little boy. I write, love cameras and audio/video editing and have anchored television. I grew up in a small town in Maine but have attended schools in Italy, Madagascar and Ghana.

What was your first job?

DJ and newsman on WTVL AM/FM, Waterville, Maine.

What do you think is the hardest part of your job that no one knows?

Making each and every one fit. “Marketplace Morning Report” has to end at 58 minutes and 58 seconds past each hour; no more, no less.

What advice do you wish someone had given you before you started this career?

Find your own voice in your on-air style and in your writing.

In your next life, what would your career be?

Astronaut. They say a key qualification for the Mars mission are folks who can fix things on the fly. I'm good at MacGyvering.

Fill in the blank: Money can’t buy you happiness, but it can buy you ______.

A McIntosh audiophile-grade stereo amplifier. No, not spelled the same as the computer. They always were too expensive for me, and now they're even more expensive.

What is something that everyone should own, no matter how much it costs?

For those who shave, a shaving brush.  And kitchen scissors. Really. It'll change your life.

What’s something that you thought you knew but later found out you were wrong about?

I thought people work in their own best interests. They don't. They use up resources until they hurt themselves. "Tragedy of the commons," economists call it.

What’s your most memorable Marketplace moment?

Live on the air, I slipped and swapped an "f" for a "p" in some copy and looked up to see an empty control room. They were all on the floor laughing at my expense.

What’s the favorite item in your workspace and why?

Besides the photo of my family, there is a 4" diameter, 4-foot-tall model rocket in the Marketplace Morning Report colors I built. It's flown to 4,000 feet.

Latest Stories (2,291)

Why upgrading voting machines is important for election integrity

High costs can prevent states from upgrading voting equipment, which can lead to security and reliability issues.
Mark Ralston/AFP via Getty Images

The complicated history of voting technology

Oct 30, 2020
MIT professor Charles Stewart III reflects on how technology both improved voting security and created new election fears.
Punch card ballots and their "hanging chads" caused a headache in the 2000 election.
Robert King/Newsmakers via Getty Images

Why this swing-state county is investing over $1 million in its voting infrastructure

Pennsylvania elections official Kenneth Lawrence says Montgomery County is gearing up for a deluge of mail-in ballots, and there won't be a final result on election night.
Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images

Should a museum auction its art to raise funds?

Oct 28, 2020
It's an existential question, says art critic Blake Gopnik. Once a work of art is in a museum, it's supposed to be more or less unsellable.
The Baltimore Museum of Art's plan to sell off pieces in its collection — including a silk screen of Andy Warhol's "The Last Supper," pictured above — was met with backlash from patrons and donors.
Lex Van Lieshout/AFP/GettyImages

Student loan debt adds to racial wealth disparities, research finds

The costs for Black borrowers to pursue a college have been growing exponentially.
Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images

How American government propaganda was born

A new book sees the roots of modern government persuasion in a World War I-era agency.
The media during the inauguration of President Woodrow Wilson. A new book by John Maxwell Hamilton sees the origins of modern government persuasion in a World War I-era office set up by the Woodrow Wilson administration in 1917.
Keystone/Getty Images

U.S. households had better bank access in 2019, FDIC says. And then the pandemic happened.

A higher unemployment rate and economic turmoil means the number of unbanked households could rise again.
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Airlines push for more COVID tests, fewer quarantines to get more people traveling

Airlines believe the fear of sitting next to an infected passenger and 14-day mandatory quarantines are keeping more people from flying.
Travelers stand at an information desk to ask about the free-of-charge COVID-19 testing station at Düsseldorf International Airport on October 19, 2020.
Ina Fassbender/AFP via Getty Images

Federal court blocks Trump's cuts on food stamps

The Trump administration's plan would have ended food stamps for nearly 700,000 unemployed people.
A sign alerting customers about SNAP food stamps benefits is displayed at a Brooklyn grocery store on Dec. 5, 2019 in New York City.
Scott Heins/Getty Images

One key to fixing the economy? Getting low-wage workers help

Christopher Low, chief economist at FHN Financial, says low-wage workers are suffering the bulk of job losses — the opposite of what happened in 2008.
A pedestrian walks by a San Francisco restaurant closed because of COVID-19.
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images