Erika Soderstrom

Latest Stories (19)

What if COVID-19 checks were a regular occurrence?

"You just get a much bigger fiscal bang for the buck," says Mark Blyth, the economics professor and author of "Angrynomics."
"We're managing to do it right now in the COVID pandemic. We send people checks," Blyth says. "Imagine if those checks were endowment checks."
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Tech companies reconsider facial recognition software

IBM says it will no longer sell or research facial recognition software, and Amazon announced a moratorium on police use of its software.
With IBM getting out of facial recognition technology altogether and Amazon pausing the use of its software by police departments, how will Microsoft act?
Tolga Akmen/AFP via Getty Images
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Why leaders look to infrastructure spending in recessions

The pitch for infrastructure projects recalls Depression-era investment in roads and bridges.
The on-ramp to the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco was built as part of the Works Progress Administration during the Great Depression.
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Americans won't be racing out to spend money as lockdown restrictions ease, early indicators suggest.
Maddie Meyer/Getty Images
FDA deregulation of COVID-19 antibody tests has led to a false sense of security for some, an unintended consequence of the move.
Al Bello/Getty Images

Americans can now tap 401(k)s without penalty. Here's how it works.

People affected by the crisis can access of up to $100,000 of their retirement savings without the usual 10% penalty.
Personal finance experts are warning, however, that you should only dip into your retirement savings in the case of an emergency.
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Startups always face bankruptcy risk. COVID-19 has made things worse.

"Small companies and a lot of us are getting a lesson in, 'Risk is real,'" one business professor says.
Startups don't have the cash flow or credit lines to deal with crises like big companies do.
Alex Wong/Getty Images

After Kobe Bryant's death, advertisers take stock of their Super Bowl campaigns

Brands are gearing up for their Super Bowl advertising campaigns, but in the wake of Kobe Bryant’s death, some are changing their approach.
A moment of silence in memory of NBA great Kobe Bryant takes place during Super Bowl Opening Night presented by BOLT24 at Marlins Park on Jan. 27, 2020 in Miami, Florida.
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Kobe Bryant's legacy as an athlete and a venture capitalist

Jan 27, 2020
"He was really diverse in this first few moments of retirement," says Kenneth Shropshire of Arizona State University.
Kobe Bryant smiles at halftime as both his #8 and #24 Los Angeles Lakers jerseys are retired at Staples Center on Dec. 18, 2017, in Los Angeles.
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