Nancy Marshall-Genzer

Senior Reporter

SHORT BIO

I report on the intersection of Washington and Wall Street, explaining how the decisions made here impact your wallet.

What was your first job?

I had a paper route. I used the money I made to buy a horse named Pokey. She totally lived up to her name, unless she was headed toward the barn around dinner time.

What do you think is the hardest part of your job that no one knows?

The scramble to get on air. I frequently work the early shift, filing for the “Marketplace Morning Report.” One morning last year, there was a fire drill a few minutes before I was supposed to go live. It stopped just in time!

In your next life, what would your career be?

A professor at Hogwarts.

What’s the favorite item in your workspace and why?

My kids' artwork. They inspire me to be creative.

Latest Stories (1,490)

Dueling views of the economy we're in

Dec 1, 2020
In their Senate testimony, Treasury chief Steven Mnuchin emphasized progress and Fed Chair Jerome Powell focused on unmet needs. Does their divergence matter?
Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin and Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell greet each other as they arrive at Tuesday's Senate Banking Committee hearing.
Al Drago/AFP via Getty Images

Janet Yellen, Biden's pick for treasury secretary, says U.S. needs more pandemic relief spending

Yellen, a former Fed chair, has advocated for more spending to aid small businesses and the unemployed during COVID-19.
Yellen is seen as an authority on what happens if the government cuts back on stimulus spending too soon.
Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

Lapse in Fed lending programs could cost companies hurt by COVID

Companies hurt by the pandemic could end up paying investors a full percentage point more in interest to buy their bonds.
Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin and Chairman of the Federal Reserve Jerome Powell testify during the Senate's Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs hearing examining the quarterly CARES Act report to Congress on Sept. 24, 2020, in Washington.
Drew Angerer/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

The voting power of Georgia teens in Senate runoff elections

Nov 19, 2020
Teens need a little extra nudging to cast ballots, so organizers in Georgia are reaching out by email, phone and more.
A pile of stickers for voters at Park Tavern on Nov. 3, 2020 in Atlanta, Georgia.
Megan Varner/Getty Images

New report says 12 million jobless workers are about to lose unemployment benefits

Nov 18, 2020
In just 38 days, 12 million jobless workers will lose their benefits. Talks on another relief bill have stalled in Congress.
Service workers will be hit especially hard when unemployment benefits expire because so many of those businesses have closed. Above, an empty restaurant serving only takeout in Washington, D.C., at the beginning of the pandemic.
Nicholas Kamm/AFP via Getty Images

Moderna says it can start analyzing how well its COVID-19 vaccine works

Moderna's clinical trial has accumulated sufficient data on volunteers with infections to analyze vaccine efficacy.
Biotechnology company Moderna protocol files for COVID-19 vaccinations are kept at the Research Centers of America in Hollywood, Fla., on Aug. 13, 2020.
Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images

Supreme Court once again weighs future of Obamacare

More than 20 million people would lose health insurance if the Supreme Court invalidates the Affordable Care Act.
"Without the Affordable Care Act, anyone trying to buy their own insurance, with a preexisting condition, would likely be denied," says Larry Levitt, executive vice president of the Kaiser Family Foundation.
Stefani Reynolds/Getty Images

Fed Chair Powell says full economic recovery depends on managing COVID-19

Social distancing and wearing masks will help get the economy back to full strength, Powell said Thursday.
Drew Angerer/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

Savings take a hit as pandemic lingers

Oct 30, 2020
People bought more stuff, like cars and home office equipment, an expert says. But also, there haven’t been any more relief checks.
Pixabay

GDP jumped 33%, but how about that output gap?

Oct 29, 2020
The growth is good, but it'll be a while before the U.S. economy is back to where it was before COVID-19 happened.
Cargo containers are stacked on a ship docked at the Port of Oakland in California. Economic output in the United States hasn't caught up yet to pre-pandemic levels.
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Marketplace + Caffeine = daily dose of awesome!

Your donation today gets you two things to keep you going – your daily news fix and your new favorite mug.