Nancy Marshall-Genzer

Senior Reporter

SHORT BIO

I report on the intersection of Washington and Wall Street, explaining how the decisions made here impact your wallet.

What was your first job?

I had a paper route. I used the money I made to buy a horse named Pokey. She totally lived up to her name, unless she was headed toward the barn around dinner time.

What do you think is the hardest part of your job that no one knows?

The scramble to get on air. I frequently work the early shift, filing for the “Marketplace Morning Report.” One morning last year, there was a fire drill a few minutes before I was supposed to go live. It stopped just in time!

In your next life, what would your career be?

A professor at Hogwarts.

What’s the favorite item in your workspace and why?

My kids' artwork. They inspire me to be creative.

Latest Stories (1,450)

Congress passes legislation to extend PPP loan deadlines

Jun 4, 2020
One change: Businesses will have more time to spend their loans and still qualify for forgiveness.
The legislation defers payroll taxes for businesses getting the loans, and it gives them more time to repay any part of a loan that isn’t forgiven.
David McNew/Getty Images

Google faces $5 billion lawsuit over allegations of tracking private browsing activity

The lawsuit accuses the company of violating users’ privacy during incognito browsing sessions.
The lawsuit says Google gathers data, even in incognito mode, through third-party apps like Google Analytics and Google Ad Manager.
Carsten Koall/Getty Images

Is it too late to fill out your 2020 census?

Jun 2, 2020
You now have until mid-August to respond to the census if you haven't yet.
The federal government will use census data to distribute almost a trillion dollars in grants and loans.
Kena Betancur/AFP via Getty Images

Chinese officials accuse Trump administration of double standard when it comes to protests

Jun 1, 2020
They accused the president of praising Hong Kong protesters, but cracking down harshly on demonstrators in the United States.
Anthony Kwan/Getty Images

Incomes rose in April, but only because of government relief payments

May 29, 2020
The Bureau of Economic Analysis reports that personal income rose by 10.5% in April. But without government relief payments, it would have fallen by roughly 5%.
President Trump signs the CARES Act in March. Personal income rose last month mainly due to the relief payments included in the act.

Job losses indicate we are in a "she-cession"

May 28, 2020
Women are disproportionately impacted by the coronavirus pandemic when it comes to jobs.
Two servers at a reopened restaurant in Las Vegas. The jobs that have been lost recently,  like servers and retail clerks, are mostly done by women.
Ethan Miller/Getty Images

When watching for the recovery, continuing jobless claims are key

May 21, 2020
The difference between initial jobless claims and overall continuing claims is an important one.
A sign at a gas station tells customers it is closed. Unemployment has reached alarming levels in the United States.
Spencer Platt/Getty Images

How we spent our relief checks

May 20, 2020
Economists at four universities studied the spending habits of about 1,600 middle and low-income consumers who got $1,200 direct payments. The money was spent on necessities like rent and food.
People shop at a Los Angeles grocery store. Americans spent their stimulus checks on the essentials, like rent and groceries.
Mario Tama/Getty Images

Buy America order could worsen medical supply shortages, economists say

May 12, 2020
More than 200 economists have signed a letter to President Trump and congressional leaders. They say a Buy America order the Trump administration is contemplating for medical supplies would push up prices and exacerbate shortages.
The Port of Los Angeles. The Buy America initiative may raise the price of medical supplies imported from China.
Mario Tama/Getty Images

Treasury expects to borrow $3 trillion over next 3 months

That's almost triple what the Treasury borrowed in the 2019 accounting year.
The Treasury needs the money to pay for all of the new stimulus spending to keep the economy afloat during the COVID-19 crisis.
Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images