That “inflation relief” money could drive prices higher
Jul 6, 2022

That “inflation relief” money could drive prices higher

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Some states are distributing inflation rebates, but some economists are critical of the programs. Plus, who steps up when local governments go broke?

Segments From this episode

It takes a long time to get from a federal drilling lease to actual oil

Jul 6, 2022
Companies have to evaluate their prospects, then come up with a budget and manage crew and equipment logistics.
While the Biden administration has reopened federal land and offshore sites to oil and gas leases, it can take months or years to actually start pumping oil. Above, an oil well in Garden City, Texas.
Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Walmart to charge transportation fees to some suppliers

Jul 6, 2022
The retailer says it's part of an effort to keep prices low for customers. That can be hard to do in the long term.
The fees Walmart charges will eventually be passed on to consumers.
George Frey/Getty Images

As inflation rises, this Michigan business owner is taking a chance on a second store

Jul 6, 2022
"I'm taking a very, very big risk opening another retail location," says Annie Lang Hartman, owner of the Michigan retail brand Wild Lettie.
Annie Lang Hartman has opened a second retail store, above, in Suttons Bay, Michigan.
Courtesy Annie Lang Hartman

Credit scores and the bias behind them

Credit scores reflect not just financial behavior, but discrimination within our economic system.

Around a dozen states are handing out tax rebates. Could that fuel more inflation?

Jul 6, 2022
It's a bit like the stimulus payments the federal government handed out early in the pandemic. Just don't call it stimulus.
Some economists think "inflation relief checks" should be more targeted or distributed in installments.
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

When governments fail to address community issues, who steps in?

Jul 6, 2022
In an excerpt from "The Fight to Save the Town," the author describes how residents get by in an Oregon county with a declining government.
A person in Detroit walks past the remains of the Packard Motor Car Co., which ceased production in the late 1950s.
Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Music from the episode

Next To You Poolside
Carino The Marias
Summer Nights Raaginder, Wisechild
It Starts with Bongos Kid Spatula
Breaking Your Silence Generationals

The team

Nancy Farghalli Executive Producer
Daisy Palacios Senior Producer
Sean McHenry Associate Producer
Andie Corban Associate Producer
Richard Cunningham Associate Producer