Stephanie Hughes

Producer

SHORT BIO

Stephanie Hughes is the producer of Marketplace Tech, which examines the growing digital economy and looks at how technology is changing the work we do every day. She’s reported on topics including the effectiveness of technology used by schools to prevent violence, startups that translate global climate data for homebuyers, and why theater majors are getting jobs writing for chatbots.

Previously, she worked as a producer for Bloomberg, where she covered finance, technology, and economics. Before that, she worked as the senior producer for “Maryland Morning,” broadcast on WYPR, the NPR affiliate in Baltimore. She’s also reported for other media outlets, including NPR’s “Morning Edition,” “All Things Considered,” “The Takeaway,” and Salon.

At WYPR, she helped produce the year-long, multi-platform series “The Lines Between Us,” which won a 2014 duPont-Columbia Award. She’s also interested in using crowdsourcing to create online projects, such as this interactive map of flags around Maryland, made from listener contributions.

A native of southern Delaware, Stephanie graduated from the University of Pennsylvania with a degree in communications, studying at the Annenberg School. Before she found her way to radio, she worked in the children’s division of the publishing house Farrar, Straus, and Giroux.

 

Latest Stories (158)

The price of lithium is way up. And right now, electric cars depend on it.

Jan 26, 2022
The metal is a key ingredient in the batteries that power all those electric cars.
The price of lithium, used in the batteries of electric vehicles, has increased by more than 40% in the past year.
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

If film festivals are about networking, what's a virtual Sundance about?

Jan 21, 2022
Sundance, one of the biggest opportunities for filmmakers to get distribution deals, is online for the second time this year.
People and cars walk and drive up and down Old Main Street where filmgoers would have gathered for the 2022 Sundance Film Festival on Jan. 6, 2022 in Park City, Utah.
George Frey/Getty Images)

Strapped community colleges to receive additional $198 million in aid from Biden administration

Jan 20, 2022
Enrollment plummeted during the pandemic, which drove many would-be students to choose work – if they could find it – over their studies.
The money from the Biden administration could help students with things like child care or emergency expenses.
Brian A. Jackson/Getty Images

To bring a feeling of celebration, are more people turning to confetti?

Dec 31, 2021
While large gatherings like the one in Times Square are being scaled back, small sales of confetti are growing for some retailers.
People write wishes on confetti that will then be dropped on New Year's Eve in Times Square.
Stephanie Hughes/Marketplace

Will Broadway's biggest week be a bust?

Dec 29, 2021
With frequent COVID outbreaks among casts and crews, dozens of performances are being canceled at what's normally a blockbuster time of year.
All of the people working on Broadway (and audience members) must be vaccinated. They’re also required to be masked when they're not performing. Above, an oversized mask from "The Phantom of the Opera" near Broadway in Times Square.
Stephanie Hughes/Marketplace

The Source Code: Susan Wojcicki

One of the most powerful leaders in the tech industry on regulation, content moderation, and creators.
CEO of YouTube, Susan Wojcicki.
Mike Windle/Getty Images

Facebook whistleblower Haugen stresses need for regulation to Senators

Oct 6, 2021
Haugen also said Facebook was also fueled by an emphasis on short-term profits.
Facebook whistleblower, Frances Haugen appears before the Senate Commerce, Science, and Transportation Subcommittee during a hearing entitled 'Protecting Kids Online: Testimony from a Facebook Whistleblower' at the Russell Senate Office Building on Oct. 5, 2021 in Washington, D.C.

Could the lessons of the pandemic be a boon to workers with disabilities?

Aug 26, 2021
Technologies that became common due to COVID have been useful for workers with disabilities. Now, returning to offices gives employers a chance to improve accessibility.
Working from home has proved liberating for many workers with disabilities, and many hope the flexibility of work during the pandemic have staying power.
shironosov via Getty Images

Mixing work and play on a company computer comes with risks

Aug 24, 2021
After being stuck at home for 18 months, it's tempting to use your work laptop for fun. But your employer may be watching.
With so many people working from home, more employers are monitoring what workers do on company computers and tracking the websites they visit.
Chris Delmas/AFP via Getty Images

Broadway theater returns with an unprecedented seven plays by Black writers

Aug 20, 2021
Their success may hinge on attracting new audiences.
Antoinette Chinonye Nwandu is one of seven Black playwrights with a new work being performed on Broadway this season.  Photograph by Beowulf Sheehan