Oct 1, 2020

A new month, same ol’ bad economy

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Plus: the warehouse business, telehealth copays and struggling bars in the pandemic.

Segments From this episode

COVID economy fallout keeps hitting already impoverished neighborhoods hardest

Oct 1, 2020
People are struggling as winter approaches, and local businesses are only sort of open.
People line up for food donations in May in the Bronx neighborhood of New York, where locals say the lines outside food pantries are like nothing they’ve ever witnessed before.
Johannes Eisele/AFP via Getty Images

For furloughed workers, the psychological toll can be as heavy as the economic one

Oct 1, 2020
Add in the pandemic, the struggle for racial justice and the uncertainty surrounding the election, and the anxiety can be overwhelming.
Being furloughed, combined with the struggle for social justice and the uncertainty around the election and the pandemic, can be overwhelming.
Spencer Platt/Getty Images

As imports boom, warehouses fill up, and businesses face a storage shortage

Oct 1, 2020
The ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach handled record amounts of imports in August. Meanwhile, warehouse rents increased by 10% from this time last year.
Warehouse rents in Southern California are up roughly 10% compared to a year ago.
Virginie Goubier/AFP via Getty Images

Canada’s tourist-driven PNE pivots to hosting film production

Oct 1, 2020
The Pacific National Exhibition in Vancouver has had a devastating 2020. Could displaced Hollywood film production help keep it afloat?
An aerial of the Pacific National Exhibition in Vancouver, British Columbia.
Courtesy of PNE

Copays no longer waived for some telehealth visits

Oct 1, 2020
The cost may push people in need of exams back to the doctor's office detering others from seeking medical help, health experts say.
Copays for virtual doctor appointments that were waived at the beginning of the pandemic are coming back.
Geber86/Getty Images

Bars struggle amid suspicion and closures during pandemic

Oct 1, 2020
Social places by nature, bars have faced tighter restrictions than many other businesses, and are suffering the consequences.
A group of people takes shots before they watch the first presidential debate at a sports bar on Sept. 29 in Washington, D.C.
Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images

This office furniture business is “kinda like a catfish”

Sep 28, 2020
“We just kind of pick up what's on the bottom and keep everything stirred up,” said Wayne Hogan, owner of Galaxy Office Furniture in North Little Rock, Arkansas.
Wayne and Lynda Hogan started their office furniture business in 1982. From their storefront in North Little Rock, Arkansas, they've witnessed the economy's ups and downs.
Courtesy of Galaxy Office Furniture

The team

Nancy Farghalli Executive Producer
Bridget Bodnar Producer
Daisy Palacios Producer
Sean McHenry Associate Producer
Maria Hollenhorst Associate Producer