The cost of getting citizen-led initiatives on the ballot has nearly doubled since 2020

To get a measure on the ballot, you need a campaign to collect signatures. That's gotten more expensive this election cycle.
The average cost for getting a citizen-led initiative on the ballot in states that allow for this has practically doubled from the 2020 election cycle to this year.
Brian Allison/Marketplace

Which states are doing something about "dark money"?

There's Arizona's citizen-led initiative in 2022. And voters in Alaska and North Dakota passed similar measures in previous years.
Arizona voters will decide on Proposition 211 this November. Voters in just a couple of other states have passed similar measures that came from citizen-led initiatives.
Alex Schroeder/Marketplace

What it takes to get a "dark money" initiative on the ballot

Arizona is one of 21 states where people can submit signatures and petition. But getting something on the ballot is no easy task.
From left, Becky Daggett, Kelly Gibbs and Diane McQueen are among the volunteers who  collected hundreds of thousands of signatures to get Proposition 211, a financial disclosure proposal, on this year's ballot.
David Brancaccio/Marketplace

An Arizona ballot measure would expose hidden spending in politics

Proposition 211 would make political nonprofits disclose the names of original donors who spend beyond certain thresholds.
Terry Goddard, a former Arizona attorney general, has tried to get a law requiring disclosure of hidden political spending on the ballot since 2016. Arizonans will vote on it next month.
Alex Schroeder/Marketplace

In Arizona, a story of secret campaign spending and rising electric bills

The story of the 2014 Arizona Corporation Commission election campaign and the influence of so-called dark money.
Arizona Corporation Commissioner Sandra Kennedy shows "Marketplace Morning Report" host David Brancaccio one of the binders, about 7 inches think, of ad-spending documents acquired by a subpoena.
Alex Schroeder/Marketplace

Did Jan. 6 change corporate giving?

Jan 6, 2022
A lot of companies promised to change their political giving following the insurrection.
Trump supporters storm the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021. The insurrection shifted how and to whom corporate PACs give,
Samuel Corum via Getty Images

Voting rights issue sparks huge fundraising across political spectrum

Apr 28, 2021
There’s been a fight over the right to vote throughout American history, but in the last year, it's gone into overdrive.
The political right calls new voting laws "reforms." The left calls them "restrictions." Millions of dollars are being spent across the political spectrum on the issue.
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

For public good, not for profit.

Trump's fundraising keeps him at the center of GOP politics

Mar 1, 2021
Former President Trump has pulled in more than $30 million in a matter of months.
Former President Donald Trump addresses the Conservative Political Action Conference held in the Hyatt Regency on Feb. 28, 2021 in Orlando, Fla.
Joe Raedle/Getty Images

What will Biden inauguration donations go to?

Jan 19, 2021
Inaugurations offer companies a chance to wish the new administration well with a donation.
Alex Wong/Getty Images

Due to "stigma," companies are pulling money from Trump and the GOP

Jan 11, 2021
From JPMorgan Chase to Marriott, companies have paused political donations to Republicans (mostly) in response to last week's riot at the U.S. Capitol.
Tiger Woods at the 2018 PGA Championship. The PGA announced it will not hold the tournament at President Trump's golf course in Bedminster, New Jersey.
Jamie Squire/Getty Images