Kimberly Adams

Correspondent

SHORT BIO

I cover the intersection between politics and the economy, with a special focus on how federal policy affects the bottom line for businesses and individuals.

What was your first job?

Dental assistant. (Flossing is crucial.)

What advice do you wish someone had given you before you started this career?

The "biggest" stories are not necessarily the most important stories to tell.

In your next life, what would your career be?

Astronaut ... definitely an astronaut.

What’s something that you thought you knew but later found out you were wrong about?

How to pronounce "subsequently."

What’s the favorite item in your workspace and why?

My mug, which says "I'm a Grown-A** Lady and I Do What I Want."

 

Latest Stories (608)

Biden prioritizes ambitious pandemic response plan

Nov 30, 2020
Biden can change things like messaging from day one in the White House. But other action will require Congress.
President-elect Joe Biden listens to Vice President-elect Kamala Harris make a statement at The Queen theater in Wilmington, Delaware, on Nov. 16, 2020.
Roberto Schmidt/AFP via Getty Images

Here’s one idea for addressing occupational segregation

Rebecca Dixon, executive director of the National Employment Law Project, said investing in the EEOC could help make the economy more inclusive.
A cashier wears a mask and gloves as she works at the Presidente Supermarket in April in Miami, Florida. Jobs that are considered dangerous are disproportionately held by people of color.
Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Manufacturers recovering as service industry continues to suffer

Nov 25, 2020
Orders for big-ticket items are a rare economic bright spot. But many businesses that rely on in-person customers are hurting.
Workers manufacture face shields in New York. Demand is healthy for medical and cleaning supplies.
Eduardo Munoz Alvarez/Getty Images

What the 2020 race (so far) has taught campaigns about how to spend money

Nov 13, 2020
Local organizing over national ads and more focus on mail-in voting are some of the takeaways from the recent election.
"We really need to get better at voting by mail and the early vote,” a Republican political consultant said of the election. Above, voters cast their ballots in Hillsboro, Virginia, on Nov. 3.
Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

Change in the White House means changing plans for some businesses

Nov 9, 2020
Companies large and small are getting ready for changes in trade, taxes and health care policy.
Then-Democratic presidential nominee former Vice President Joe Biden and Sen. Kamala Harris deliver remarks in August in Wilmington, Delaware.
Drew Angerer/Getty Images

How the election will shape economic policy before inauguration

Nov 3, 2020
Analysts predict the outcome of the election will play a key role in what legislation makes it through the legislative process before the end of this year.
Election results could determine how much legislation is passed between now and the end of the year.
Jessica McGowan/Getty Images

Americans are contributing more than cash to the 2020 election

Oct 30, 2020
In Missouri, a change in the law allowed more people to vote by mail, but with a catch. A new group of volunteers stepped up.
Jill Anderson guides Cynthia Barounis through the notarization process outside Rooster restaurant in St. Louis. A change to Missouri law allows most people to vote absentee or by mail, but mail-in ballots must be notarized.
Kimberly Adams

Who pays for election recounts?

Oct 28, 2020
Rules vary by state in terms of whether taxpayers or candidates have to foot the bill for a recount in a close race.
Jason Redmond/AFP via Getty Images

Money is still flooding into the campaigns. But how to spend it?

Oct 22, 2020
In the final run-up to Election Day, campaigns, parties and outside groups are rushing to spend unprecedented cash on hand.
Television screens air the first presidential debate at a sports bar on Sept. 29, in Washington, D.C.
Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images

How much do you trust government data? It depends on your politics

Oct 15, 2020
According to the latest Marketplace-Edison Research Poll, Biden supporters are less likely than Trump supporters to believe economic data from the federal government.
Thuli Katerere-Virima is one of 7% of Biden supporters who still have full confidence in government economic data.
Kimberly Adams/Marketplace