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Gas prices, explained

Oct 18, 2019

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Anti-hunger advocates eye latest food insecurity data

by Kimberly Adams Sep 4, 2019
The USDA's report on "Household Food Security in the U.S." uses a variety of measures to gauge whether households are food insecure, such as whether people have had to skip a meal or reduce the size of a meal for…
Stephen Chernin/Getty Images

The child poverty rate today is the same as in 1990

by Marielle Segarra Jun 17, 2019
In 2017, the child poverty rate was 18%. Go back nearly three decades to 1990: also 18%.
Children play as a woman, a member of the Navajo Nation, fills bottles of water at a public tap on June 05, 2019 in Thoreau, New Mexico.
Spencer Platt/Getty Images

How we define affordable housing "makes absolutely no sense"

by Amy Scott Jun 5, 2019
How did 30% of income become the accepted benchmark?
Starrett City, a 46-building housing complex, is pictured in Brooklyn, New York, in 2018.
Drew Angerer/Getty Images

African Americans' wages nearly stagnant over decade

by Mitchell Hartman Apr 18, 2019
After adjusting for inflation, black workers' median weekly earnings have risen at a fraction of the pace of wages for white, Hispanic and Asian workers.
Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Study looks at where the IRS audits more and less

by Kai Ryssdal Apr 15, 2019
“It is, in a way, a map of poverty in this country,” ProPublica reporter Paul Kiel says.
Scott Olson/Getty Images

North Carolina is trying to lower health care costs for state workers by limiting how much the state pays some health providers

by Alexandra Olgin Feb 26, 2019
North Carolina is taking a step toward lowering costs for state workers.
The state is taking a step toward lowering costs for state workers by taking control of how much it pays for each visit to mental health and primary care providers.
iStock/Getty Images Plus

Urban Institute analyzes reach of social safety net

by Erika Beras Feb 6, 2019
A new analysis by the Urban Institute finds that a quarter of Americans living in poverty don’t receive public assistance such as food stamps, subsidized housing, child care or cash benefits.
A sign in a market window advertises the acceptance of food stamps in New York City.
Spencer Platt/Getty Images

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California’s devastating wildfires have made it harder for some day workers to find employment

by Emily Elena Dugdale Jan 1, 2019
Recent devastating wildfires burned down more than 300 homes in Malibu, California — one of the wealthiest cities in California. Many homeowners there employed gardeners and housekeepers who lost their jobs. Oscar Mondragόn, the director of the Malibu Community Labor Exchange,…
The ruins of an ocean view home are seen in the aftermath of the Woolsey Fire in Malibu, California.
DAVID MCNEW/AFP/Getty Images

Minimum wage hikes have varying effects across nation

by Justin Ho Dec 31, 2018
Twenty states are raising their minimum wages as we usher in 2019.
Workers celebrate outside the Ronald Reagan State Building in downtown Los Angeles on April 4, 2016, after California Gov. Jerry Brown signed a bill that will raise the state's minimum wage to $15 an hour by 2022.
FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images

Scooters could improve mobility in low-income areas, but they have an image problem

by Meghan McCarty Carino Dec 5, 2018
They can be left anywhere, which riles wealthy communities. But that might make them surprisingly effective in underserved neighborhoods.
A user rides a Spin scooter in San Francisco.
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images