Eggs are so cheap, the U.S. is stepping in to buy some

Sep 2, 2016
A 1935 program authorizes the U.S.D.A's purchase of excess commodities, like eggs.
A notice that the price of eggs will be rising soon is seen at a Giant grocery store in Clifton, Virginia. In 2015, widespread outbreaks of Avian Flu costed poultry producers almost 40 million birds, causing the price of eggs to rise sharply.

 

 

 
PAUL J. RICHARDS/AFP/Getty Images

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Local non-profit milk banks say shortages are causing them to turn patients away.

Coke's got milk. Premium milk.

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More protein, less sugar, but real milk.

What bottles of milk tell you about the farm bill

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California cheese creates a problem for California dairies

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Rising milk prices affect foods from pizza to nachos

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Many dairy farmers culled their herds because of high feed prices caused by the drought, reducing the supply of milk. Price increases will flow through many food products beyond a carton of milk.

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Milk consumption at lowest in decades

Sep 6, 2012
Americans are drinking less milk as sports drinks, water and other beverages pour it on.

Spilled and spoiled: Exploring two worlds of food waste

Aug 27, 2012
An alarming amount of the food we produce is never eaten. It’s a huge waste of land, water, labor, fuel and other resources. How to limit the losses? That depends on where we live.

Spilled and spoiled: In the U.S., consumers are the food wasters

Aug 27, 2012
Where food is cheap and plentiful, consumers are the biggest wasters -- whether at home, in restaurants or at school. But how much of this waste is preventable?