The transistor's role in the birth of Silicon Valley

Silicon Valley exists for a number of reasons. Chief among them might be the mother of a Nobel Prize winner.
Companies like Intel were born from the semiconductor revolution. But how did silicon — and the transistor — end up in California?
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What does it take for chip manufacturers to get a new plant up and running?

Aug 23, 2022
Semiconductor makers seek locations with plenty of space, water, electricity and workers. First, they need megabucks for construction.
An array of machines at a semiconductor plant in Germany. Now that the CHIPS Act has passed, chipmakers are looking to build more facilities in the U.S.
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Chips from Intel's new $20 billion factories won't be ready to use for years

Jan 21, 2022
The semiconductor giant is thinking long term.
With consumers' appetite for smart cars and appliances, demand for Intel's chips isn't going away anytime soon.
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Apple's acquisition of Intel's smartphone modem business is all about control

Jul 26, 2019
The iPhone manufacturer is buying the ability to make its own modem chips.
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Intel earnings expected to weather the Meltdown and Spectre

Jan 25, 2018
Security issues and faulty fixes have vexed computer giant Intel, and that’s just in January. But analysts say the problems probably won’t dent profits in the long term. Intel releases its quarterly earnings report later today. The company has generated a lot of not-so-great headlines in recent weeks over major security vulnerabilities in its processors. […]

What to do when a couple of security flaws are affecting almost every computer in the world

Jan 4, 2018
An analyst walks us through the Meltdown and Spectre bugs.
all is possible/visual hunt

For public good, not for profit.

As esports gain legitimacy, corporate America looks to cash in

Jun 21, 2017
Would you spend hours watching someone play video games? NBC and Intel are betting that you would.
For its first esport tournament, NBC has chosen Rocket League — a video game where cars instead of people play soccer. 
Courtesy of Psyonix

Intel says Moore’s Law lives on

Mar 29, 2017
The prediction that foreshadowed advancements in computing is here to stay, EVP says.
“I think the big impact of Moore's Law though is just that basic model of being able to double the capability every year or bring the cost down every year,” Stacy Smith of Intel says.
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Automakers and tech companies fight over smart cars

Mar 14, 2017
Intel announced this week it’s acquiring the Israeli company Mobileye for about $15 billion. The merger is part of the tech giant’s bid to become a leader in developing self-driving vehicles. The convergence of automobiles and technology is making for some interesting deal making, and the ones that stand to gain right now just may […]

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