Apr 29, 2021

Tearing down houses in the flood zone

HTML EMBED:
COPY
Recent flooding in Nashville has renewed the federal government's practice of buying and tearing down houses that are at risk. Plus, the Federal Reserve once again leaves interest rates near zero. Also, an update on how the global chip shortage is affecting carmakers and tech companies. And, the Justice Department reverses a Trump-era policy on cutting money to "sanctuary cities."

Segments From this episode

Fed once again leaves interest rates unchanged

Chair Jerome Powell says the Fed is committed to its goals of 2% inflation and full employment.
Fed Chair Jerome Powell says the higher inflation we’re seeing now in some parts of the economy is temporary, and unemployment is still too high.
Jim Lo Scalzo/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

Federal money withheld from "sanctuary cities" back in play

Apr 29, 2021
For some jurisdictions, the grant money is the biggest source of federal law enforcement funding.
Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

Nashville flooding renews federal push to tear down homes

Apr 29, 2021
Those in areas prone to flooding are weighing whether it's better to stay in a home, or take a government buyout.
Baylie McDaniel is a public school teacher in Nashville who is starting the long process of rebuilding after floodwaters inundated her home in late March. She says she'd prefer the city to focus on controlling Seven Mile Creek rather than buying homes to tear them down.
Blake Farmer/WPLN News

Music from the episode

3OWLS Marvin Romero

The team

Nicole Childers Executive Producer
Victoria Craig Producer, BBC
Stephen Ryan Producer, BBC
Jonathan Frewin Producer, BBC
Daniel Shin Producer
Jay Siebold Engineer
Brian Allison Engineer
Alex Schroeder Digital producer
Meredith Garretson Producer
Erika Soderstrom Producer/Director