Jul 11, 2017

07/11/2017: How ‘Too Big to Fail’ became a thing

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The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau has adopted a new rule that will allow consumers to sue financial institutions in class-action lawsuits. On today's show, we'll look at the route you've typically had to take in the event that you had a financial dispute, and what industries this new rule will apply to. Afterwards, ProPublica's Jesse Eisinger joins us to discuss why it's difficult to indict corporations. 

Segments From this episode

As soda sales lose their fizz, Pepsico looks to healthier drinks and snacks

Jul 11, 2017
PepsiCo reports second quarter earnings today. The snack and beverage conglomerate has consistently beaten estimates in recent quarters — even as Americans drink less soda than they have in three decades. Can PepsiCo keep the streak going?  Click the audio player above to hear the full story. Stories You Might Like 10/25/2017: Investors ask female entrepreneurs different […]

Why aren't more bankers in jail after the financial crisis?

Jul 11, 2017
A look at why the Department of Justice pursues settlements instead of indictments.
Two employees of Christie's auction house maneuver the Lehman Brothers corporate logo on September 24, 2010 in London, England. Lehman Brothers, a financial services firm, was a key entity in the financial crisis that was not deemed too big to fail.
Oli Scarff/Getty Images

Companies offer "financial wellness" programs as a job perk

Jul 11, 2017
An increasing number of companies have started offering free programs to teach employees how to manage their own money.
Ashly Johnson recently finished a manager training program with Waffle House, where she learned how to run a restaurant -- and manage her own personal finances better.
Elly Yu

California’s wildfires are only getting more risky — and expensive

Jul 11, 2017
California Gov. Jerry Brown has issued a state of emergency for two wildfires that have forced thousands of people along the state’s central coast to get out of harm’s way. Wildfire season has been extended by 70 to 80 days in the past decade, and California has increased its emergency fund to reflect new predictions. Local, […]

07/11/2017: The Fed could have a new top banking regulator

Jul 11, 2017
The Trump administration has selected Randal Quarles, a former Treasury official, to be the Fed's vice chairman for bank supervision. On today's show, we'll talk about what the position entails and why it's such a significant one. Afterwards, we'll discuss the resources it takes to combat California's wildfires, and then look at an increase in "financial wellness" programs offered by companies to their employees.

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau has adopted a new rule that will allow consumers to sue financial institutions in class-action lawsuits. On today’s show, we’ll look at the route you’ve typically had to take in the event that you had a financial dispute, and what industries this new rule will apply to. Afterwards, ProPublica’s Jesse Eisinger joins us to discuss why it’s difficult to indict corporations. 

The team

Stephen Ryan Producer, BBC