COVID-19

One reason why Black-owned businesses have fared worse in the pandemic: weaker banking relationships

Kristin Schwab Aug 4, 2020
Heard on: Marketplace
HTML EMBED:
COPY
A beauty product booth at a Black-owned business expo in Florida. The number of Black business owners in the U.S. fell more than 40% between February and April, according to a New York Fed study. Octavio Jones/Getty Images
COVID-19

One reason why Black-owned businesses have fared worse in the pandemic: weaker banking relationships

Kristin Schwab Aug 4, 2020
A beauty product booth at a Black-owned business expo in Florida. The number of Black business owners in the U.S. fell more than 40% between February and April, according to a New York Fed study. Octavio Jones/Getty Images
HTML EMBED:
COPY

For the last several months, we’ve been watching the COVID-19 pandemic hit Black-owned businesses particularly hard. A new report from the New York Federal Reserve confirms it — and looks into the reasons why. A lot of it comes down to relationships with banks.

Getting that first round of Paycheck Protection Program funding was like running a race. And Vera Daniels was miles away from the starting line when the gun went off.

“I sent emails out to a listing of about 100 banks,” she said. “It just felt helpless.”

Daniels owns Wellness Tea Therapy, a teahouse and wellness center in Brooklyn, New York. She banks with a credit union, but it couldn’t help her apply for a loan. So she had to find a bank that would. But “the banks suggested that their primary concern would be their customers,” Daniels said.

She still hasn’t found funding. She’s pivoted to online sales and said she’s hanging in there. But a lot of other Black entrepreneurs can’t say the same. The number of Black business owners in the United States fell more than 40% between February and April, according to the New York Fed study. That’s more than double the decline of white business owners.

“We saw that there were real differences going into the crisis between Black- and white-owned businesses,” said Claire Kramer Mills, who co-authored the study.

She said a lot of this had to do with access to capital. Traditionally, Black businesses have had to look to friends or family, to 401(k)s, to short-term and often predatory lenders — and not to banks.

Meanwhile, Black-owned businesses are concentrated in places COVID-19 has hit hardest.

“These places have had a double whammy,” Kramer Mills said.

“It’s just like really worsening an already bad situation in the Black community,” said Belinda Archibong, professor of economics at Barnard College. She said Black health and Black wealth are intertwined. And the only way to change the outlook for Black-owned businesses where COVID-19 has hit hard is to directly allocate funds to them.

“And that’s something that needs to happen with federal regulation,” Archibong said, like a targeted federal loan program.

That’s important now that it’s clear this COVID-19 crisis is a marathon, not a sprint.

Additional reporting by Lukas Southard.

COVID-19 Economy FAQs

What does the unemployment picture look like?

It depends on where you live. The national unemployment rate has fallen from nearly 15% in April down to 8.4% percent last month. That number, however, masks some big differences in how states are recovering from the huge job losses resulting from the pandemic. Nevada, Hawaii, California and New York have unemployment rates ranging from 11% to more than 13%. Unemployment rates in Idaho, Nebraska, South Dakota and Vermont have now fallen below 5%.

Will it work to fine people who refuse to wear a mask?

Travelers in the New York City transit system are subject to $50 fines for not wearing masks. It’s one of many jurisdictions imposing financial penalties: It’s $220 in Singapore, $130 in the United Kingdom and a whopping $400 in Glendale, California. And losses loom larger than gains, behavioral scientists say. So that principle suggests that for policymakers trying to nudge people’s public behavior, it may be better to take away than to give.

How are restaurants recovering?

Nearly 100,000 restaurants are closed either permanently or for the long term — nearly 1 in 6, according to a new survey by the National Restaurant Association. Almost 4.5 million jobs still haven’t come back. Some restaurants have been able to get by on innovation, focusing on delivery, selling meal or cocktail kits, dining outside — though that option that will disappear in northern states as temperatures fall. But however you slice it, one analyst said, the United States will end the year with fewer restaurants than it began with. And it’s the larger chains that are more likely to survive.

Read More

Collapse

As a nonprofit news organization, our future depends on listeners like you who believe in the power of public service journalism.

Your investment in Marketplace helps us remain paywall-free and ensures everyone has access to trustworthy, unbiased news and information, regardless of their ability to pay.

Donate today — in any amount — to become a Marketplace Investor. Now more than ever, your commitment makes a difference.

Raise a glass to Marketplace!

Just $7/month gets you a limited edition KaiPA pint glass. Plus bragging rights that you support independent journalism.
Donate today to get yours!