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The politics of promoting the family

| Mar 15, 2005
Today the House Way and Means Committee took up something called TAN-F. You've probably heard of 'Temporary Assistance for Needy Families'. During the Clinton years, 'TAN-F' largely replaced what most folks used to call 'welfare'... Perhaps another rethink is due. In a new book, University of Pennsylvania Sociologist Kathryn Edin writes that there's a new war on poverty. It's called 'promoting marriage'...

Hurry, you can also "Rent a CFO"

| Mar 15, 2005
Tomorrow's the deadline for many businesses to let investors behind the curtain. Remember something called the Sarbanes-Oxley act? Nowadays publicly traded companies have to give investors the lowdown of lots of details..From inventory tracking to computer security and nooks and crannies in between. This is serious financial housekeeping. Not the sort of job you farm out to a temp worker. Then again, maybe its just a question of finding the right kind of temp worker. From Seattle, Cathy Duchamp reports.
Posted In: Wall Street

Reshaping the American labor movement

| Mar 15, 2005
The American labor movement - losing membership and political clout - is trying to re-tool to become more relevant for modern workers. Union leaders have targeted the fastest growing segment of the labor force - professional and technical workers. But traditional unions have not kept pace with the changing nature of white collar work with the new world of contracting and outsourcing and temporary projects. John Dimsdale reports unions are being told they must change... or die.

Investing in workplace health is saving money

| Mar 15, 2005
A study just released by Brigham Young University shows that folks who participate in workplace health programs miss fewer workdays than others. That drop in absenteeism saves businesses nearly $16 for each dollar they spend on those programs. From Marketplace's Work & Family Desk, Sarah Gardner looks at how companies are emphasizing prevention to keep a lid on skyrocketing health care costs.

Tobacco millionaires?

| Mar 14, 2005
Today marks the beginning of the end of a long running federal support program. Since the 1930's, the government's told tobacco farmers you can grow this much, and you're guaranteed a price. Now the government's offering to buy back those quotas. There's a $10 billion pot of money to be paid out to farmers. Who wants to be a millionaire? Leonida Inge reports from North Carolina.

Medical malpractice math

| Mar 14, 2005
The American Medical Association opened what it calls an "Advocacy Conference" in Washington today. Advocating what? Ask many doctors and you'll hear horror stories about insurance premiums. President Bush has proposed a plan to cap malpractice awards. The idea is to rein in those rising insurance rates. Commentator and consumer activist Jamie Court says someone ought to check the math.

China's Lenovo ... wants to know you

| Mar 14, 2005
IBM today said it's agreed to an Ascential acquistion. The acquisition is the 40th in the past ten years by IBM's software group. And it burns up just over $1 billion. There's a certain symmetry here. Its almost as much as what IBM sold its PC business for a few weeks ago. The buyer: a Chinese company called Lenovo. You may not have heard of them. But as Jocelyn Ford reports, those folks at Lenovo have been hearing a lot about you.
Posted In: Canada

General Motors and a bumpy road

| Mar 14, 2005
Last year General Motors made media buys worth $2.8 billion. Mostly through the Interpublic Group. Today the world's largest car company put that action up for bid. GM says it's trying to respond to a changing media landscape. And cut costs too. GM's been losing market share in the U.S. to rivals like Toyota. Put that together with the falling dollar and what do you get? Some surprises at one of the world's most prestigious auto shows. Dan Neil of the LA Times is our transportation commentator. And he's just back from Geneva...
Posted In: Wall Street

Wall Street and that falling dollar

| Mar 14, 2005
Wall Street is trying to take advantage of the falling dollar. But should you? In this edition of The Sloan Sessions, Newsweek's Wall Street editor Allan Sloan tells host Kai Ryssdal why he wouldn't bet on the dollar's continued decline.
Posted In: Wall Street

Bombay's new image

| Mar 14, 2005
India's economy is surging. A recent economic survey predicted India will grow at 7% this year. But many say that to keep that growth going, India needs to improve its infrastructure. To that end, the government has devoted 6 billion dollars to a massive urban renewal project in India's financial capital, Bombay. Half of its 16 million residents live in the slums. As Miranda Kennedy reports, the government's first step is clearing them out.
Posted In: Canada

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