Who got those PPP loans? The government doesn't want to tell.

Jun 15, 2020
The Trump administration says the relevant part is that the COVID-19 relief loans complied with the law — not who actually got them.
Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin speaks at a Senate Small Business and Entrepreneurship Committee hearing.
Al Drago Pool/Getty Images

The man in charge of TARP: "I'm proud of the actions that we took"

Sep 4, 2018
Neel Kashkari on the 2008 financial crisis and what Congress would do if another crisis hits.
Neel Kashkari, former-interim assistant secretary for financial stability and assistant secretary for international affairs at the Treasury Department, waits for the start of the hearing by the Senate Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs Committee October 23, 2008, on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C.
Joshua Roberts/Getty Images

Neel Kashkari wants to end Too Big To Fail

Nov 17, 2016
The President of the Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis says he has a plan to drastically reduce the chances of another bailout of big banks.
Neel Kashkari, US Treasury Department Assistant Secretary for Financial Stability, discusses the Troubled Asset Relief Program (TARP), the federal government's $700 billion bailout program, in a forum at Georgetown University's McDonough School of Business on January 13, 2009 in Washington, DC. 
Jonathan Ernst/Getty Images

The TARP police are still on call

Mar 16, 2015
The big auto and bank buyouts are over, but the fund lives on

Why the Ally IPO is good news for taxpayers

Apr 10, 2014
Taxpayers will receive nearly $2.4 billion from their IPO

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Ghosts of TARP haunt community banks

Oct 8, 2013
While the big banks have mostly paid the money back, small community banks are now struggling.

TARP, five years later

Oct 3, 2013
Five years ago today, the Troubled Asset Relief Program became law.

States divert foreclosure prevention money to demolitions

Sep 3, 2013
The Treasury Department has changed the rules on a program meant to help people hit by the housing crisis stay in their homes, allowing states to use some money from the $7.6 billion foreclosure prevention program to demolish homes instead.