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Holiday hiring hustle and bustle

Nov 15, 2019

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The Indian schools where failure isn't an option

by Anu Anand May 20, 2019
Fierce competition for university spots has led to an increase in "cram schools."
Abhair (L) sits with fellow pupils at a cram school just outside Delhi.
Victoria Craig/BBC

5 ways the SAT has tried to reinvent itself

by Janet Nguyen May 16, 2019
The College Board is introducing an adversity score on the SAT.
Students taking a test in a classroom.
Chris Ryan/Getty Images

Will the college admissions scandal make the process more transparent?

by Amy Scott Mar 14, 2019
Elite schools have their choice of applicants and reveal little about how those choices are made.
The media is seen outside the Edward R. Roybal Federal Building and United States Courthouse on March 13, 2019 in Los Angeles, California.  Actors Felicity Huffman, Lori Loughlin and designer Mossimo Giannulli are among 50 people charged in a college admission cheating scheme that involves bribery and fraud in attempts to get students recruited as athletes and help them cheat on exams.
Frederick M. Brown/Getty Images

Wealthy families already have legal ways of gaming college admissions

by , and Mar 13, 2019
Let's not forget the options that don't carry jail sentences.
Parents allegedly spent up to $6.5 million dollars in bribes to help get their kids into top schools.
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Scandal sheds light on murky world of college admissions

by Amy Scott Mar 12, 2019
Some are calling it the biggest college admissions cheating scandal in history. Federal prosecutors allege that more than 30 wealthy parents paid college coaches and test administrators to boost their kids’ chances of getting into elite schools. The scandal is…
Stanford University sailing coach John Vandemoer arrives at Boston Federal Court for an arraignment on March 12, 2019 in Boston, Massachusetts. John Vandemoer is among several charged in alleged college admissions scam.
Scott Eisen/Getty Images

Applying to college amid the Harvard admissions lawsuit

by Justin Ho Jan 10, 2019
High school students weigh in on admissions policies and race as the college application season comes to a close.
A prospective student enters the Harvard University Admissions Building in Cambridge, Massachusetts.
Glen Cooper/Getty Images

Early decision college process faces DOJ scrutiny

by Amy Scott Apr 16, 2018
Early admission can give students an edge and colleges some welcome certainty.
A   video  screenshot of Rylee Hickman, a high school senior in St. Petersburg, Florida, awaiting an early decision message from Cornell University.
Screenshot by Donna Tam/Marketplace

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Students flock to historically black colleges where they feel welcome

by Amy Scott Oct 24, 2017
Rising racial tension is one reason for the growth.
First-year student NaTavia Williams came to Morgan State from Colorado to study multimedia journalism.
Amy Scott/Marketplace

Relax: If you applied to college, you'll probably get in

by Tony Wagner Sep 8, 2016
A new survey says the average acceptance rate is around 65 percent.
College admissions season can be a stressful time, but a new survey suggests it doesn't have to be. Above, the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor.
Bill Pugliano/Getty Images

Supreme Court upholds race-conscious admissions plan

by Amy Scott Jun 23, 2016
Relatively few colleges explicitly consider race in admissions. Will that change?
People walk up to the U.S. Supreme Court building June 20, 2016 in Washington, DC.
Mark Wilson/Getty Images