Oct 25, 2017

10/25/2017: Hey, how much are you making?

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That question is illegal in some places, as a new wave of laws in cities and states prohibit employers from asking for a job candidate's salary history in the hiring process. And the Senate struck down a rule that made it easier for consumers to sue banks and credit card companies for financial relief, which also allows banks to keep using mandatory arbitration clauses. We explore what this means for consumers like yourself and the arbitration industry. Plus, on this week's edition of Corner Office, we talk to the CEO of the National Park Foundation, which is tasked with raising private funds for the National Park Service. The NPS needs those funds badly — they released a proposal today that would more than double the entrance fee at some of the most popular parks during peak visits.

 

Segments From this episode

After Niger, counting up the military's far flung missions

Oct 25, 2017
Some lawmakers want to revisit the way we authorize the use of military force around the world.

The old salary history question could be on its way out for good

Oct 25, 2017
Narrowing the pay gap between men and women is the goal of new laws in California, Oregon, New York City, San Francisco and other jurisdictions.
A woman joins with other protesters to ask that woman be given the chance to have equal pay as their male co-workers on March 2017 in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. 
Joe Raedle/Getty Images

For two DACA entrepreneurs, it may be the end of business as usual

Oct 25, 2017
One couple in San Diego confronts an uncertain future for themselves and the businesses they've built
Dulce Garcia and Luis Tinoco have been dating for more than 15 years. They're both DACA recipients who own businesses just a few blocks away from each other.
Reema Khrais/Marketplace

The private dollars that help fund our national parks

Oct 25, 2017
The National Park Foundation helps fill the gap when the Park Service's $3 billion budget falls short.
Point Reyes National Seashore
Share the Experience/Angie Marcelynas

How restrictions on class action lawsuits affect the arbitration industry

Oct 25, 2017
A vote by the U.S. Senate last night allowing banks to keep using mandatory arbitration clauses in their contracts with consumers — rather than allowing class action lawsuits —essentially preserves the status quo. You might think that more fine print in more and more contracts would mean a lot more arbitration and a bonanza for […]

That question is illegal in some places, as a new wave of laws in cities and states prohibit employers from asking for a job candidate’s salary history in the hiring process. And the Senate struck down a rule that made it easier for consumers to sue banks and credit card companies for financial relief, which also allows banks to keep using mandatory arbitration clauses. We explore what this means for consumers like yourself and the arbitration industry. Plus, on this week’s edition of Corner Office, we talk to the CEO of the National Park Foundation, which is tasked with raising private funds for the National Park Service. The NPS needs those funds badly — they released a proposal today that would more than double the entrance fee at some of the most popular parks during peak visits.

 

Music from the episode

Money Pink Floyd
Sound Is Vibration Atmosphere
Apache Incredible Bongo Band
Antenna Bonobo
Someday The Strokes