Reema Khrais

Host and reporter

SHORT BIO

I'm the host of “This Is Uncomfortable,” a podcast about how money influences our lives and relationships. I spend most of my days interviewing people with surprising, intimate stories around money and jobs.

What was your first job?

Pizzeria hostess — for months, my diet consisted of BBQ chicken and garlic bread.

In your next life, what would your career be?

Game show presenter.

What’s your most memorable Marketplace moment?

One day, I was recording a story in the studio when LeVar Burton casually walks in, realizes he's interrupted something, apologizes profusely and leaves before I could say anything.

What’s the favorite item in your workspace and why?

A heating pad because we work in a large freezer.

Latest Stories (204)

Business school felt like a better bet than art, but an adviser encouraged her to take the plunge

Aug 5, 2022
"I know that art is something that I'm very interested in, but I wasn't sure if I was going to be able to make money doing it," says Devin Tormey.
Devin Tormey paints wedding scenes live.
Casey Durgin Photo

How teen mall hot spot Claire’s went from bankruptcy to IPO filing

Aug 5, 2022
The chain has benefited from '90s fashion trends, a good supply chain and looking outside of malls, says Elizabeth Segran of Fast Company.
Claire's has a team of "trend spotters" who travel the world looking for the next popular thing, says Elizabeth Segran of Fast Company. 
David McNew/Getty Images

FX series "The Bear" reminds some chefs why they left the restaurant industry

Aug 4, 2022
"A lot of people romanticize restaurant work" and don't realize how stressful it can be, says Genevieve Yam, assistant editor at Epicurious.
The after party for the Los Angeles premiere of FX's series "The Bear" at Goya Studios on June 20.
Amy Sussman/Getty Images

Crypto for kids?

Apr 14, 2022
A conversation with Rebecca Jennings of Vox on the growing new industry that teaches children about cryptocurrency, NFTs and Web3.
Internet culture reporter Rebecca Jennings says a growing cohort of camps, startups and media aim to prepare children for the future of the internet. What lessons are the kids learning?
Chaloner Woods/Getty Images

Why are there so many celebrity beauty brands?

Jan 17, 2022
Beauty reporter Cheryl Wischhover says social media and industry profits are behind the abundance of celebrity makeup and skincare lines.
A display of Fenty Beauty products, a brand launched by Rihanna, is seen in the United Kingdom.
Ian Forsyth/Getty Images

The creative force behind a viral corporate TikTok account

Jan 17, 2022
Duolingo’s social media coordinator on their big green owl, the “Wendy’s effect” and changing the voice of brands online.
Thanks to its Gen Z social media coordinator and big green owl, the official TikTok account for language learning company Duolingo recently blew up.
Photo Illustration by Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Former restauranteur manages challenges with sauce business venture

Dec 24, 2021
Kiki Aranita turned to focus efforts on growing the Poi Dog Sauces brand after she decided to close her Philadelphia restaurant during the pandemic.
After closing her Philadelphia restaurant, Kiki Aranita launched a sauce company called Poi Dog Sauces.
Poi Dog

Being single in the U.S. comes at a cost

Dec 22, 2021
Author Anne Helen Petersen compares being single in the United States to living in a hostile climate like the Arctic.
"Nearly 40% of the population is either single or a single parent, and the ways in which people are falling through these social safety nets” demonstrates the need for change, said author Anne Helen Petersen.
Leon Neal via Getty Images

The return-to-office industry is booming

Dec 22, 2021
A flood of return-to-office consultants are rushing to fill the void of expertise created by pandemic uncertainty.
Companies are spending millions for advice on bringing employees back to offices says Matthew Boyle, a senior reporter for Bloomberg.
Ina Fassenbender/AFP via Getty Images

Did department stores train people to be difficult customers?

Aug 13, 2021
Amanda Mull, a staff writer at The Atlantic, argues that department stores had a hand in building class consciousness.
Customers shop at Macys department store in New York on Black Friday, Nov. 27, 2020.
Kena Betancur/AFP via Getty Images