Mitchell Hartman

Senior Reporter

SHORT BIO

I am a staff reporter for Marketplace covering the economy, economic indicators, employment, labor and workforce.

What was your first job?

I had a job every summer during college running the receiving dock in a large sheet metal factory in North Jersey that made cans. My first job in journalism was as an editorial clerk at the Philadelphia Inquirer after graduating college in 1985.

What do you think is the hardest part of your job that no one knows?

Marketplace has among the tightest deadlines and the most demanding expectations for daily news stories of any national public radio newsroom IMHO.

What advice do you wish someone had given you before you started this career?

If you love your job, stick with it. If you're really good at something, keep doing it.

In your next life, what would your career be?

Bodhisattva (in the Mahayana Buddhist tradition, a being on the brink of enlightenment who could end the cycle of rebirth and gain nirvana but chooses to return out of compassion for other beings). Seriously, if I came back in a next life, it would confirm this teaching and I would care more about being in harmony with the universe than having another career. If I had to choose a career (and just be a bodhisattva on the side, I guess), I'd be a public radio reporter again.

Fill in the blank: Money can’t buy you happiness, but it can buy you ______.

Tickets.

What is something that everyone should own, no matter how much it costs?

Health insurance.

What’s something that you thought you knew but later found out you were wrong about?

Being a parent would constrain my choices and box me in. It did, but I didn't care.

What’s your most memorable Marketplace moment?

Emceeing a Sotheby's auction of literary memorabilia from the Beat Generation — I sold Jack Kerouac's last shot glass for high six figures. (As David Brancaccio was oft-required to say on air after segments like this: “It was a joke!”)

What’s the favorite item in your workspace and why?

Eve Epstein, my former editor and now office mate in the Marketplace Portland bureau at All Classical Portland.

Latest Stories (1,722)

Omicron's impact on inflation and supply chains is uncertain

Dec 1, 2021
Fed Chair Jerome Powell says policymakers are monitoring the impact of the variant and are ready to act to address high inflation.
It might be too early to tell how exactly the new variant will impact global supply chains. Above, a trader works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange on Nov. 29.
Spencer Platt via Getty Images

Millennials locked out of hot real estate markets

Nov 29, 2021
The National Association of Realtors reported on Monday that pending home sales were up 7.5% in October.
Millennials are staying in their apartments for longer than they would have a decade ago, likely due to the high cost of first-time homes.
Spencer Platt via Getty Images

The travel industry is still feeling the loss of business customers

Nov 25, 2021
They're a huge source of income — and a full recovery won't happen without them.
Air travel for Thanksgiving this year is expected to be near pre-pandemic levels, but business travel is still lagging behind.
Anna Moneymaker via Getty Images

The economy is adding more jobs than reports first reflect

Nov 18, 2021
Other employment numbers have been subject to a lot of revision as well.
Many employment statistics and reports have been revised, pointing to difficulties in understanding real-time labor conditions amid the pandemic. Above, a pedestrian walks past a "help wanted" sign.
Justin Sullivan via Getty Images

Inflation is hiding within retail sales spikes

Nov 16, 2021
While prices are rising for consumers, that's not discouraging them from making purchases.
A woman shops at a Miami Target in September. While retail sales were up 16.3% year over year in October, inflation is eating up a lot of that increase.
Joe Raedle via Getty Images

Health care still reeling from the mass exodus of workers

Nov 15, 2021
While health care has rebounded, tens of thousands of workers still haven't returned.
Thousands of workers have left health care, and they haven't been coming back.
Getty Images

Why are people so glum about the economy?

Nov 12, 2021
Wages are up and unemployment is down. So why has consumer sentiment plunged to levels not seen in a decade?
The pandemic and inflation are weighing on consumers' moods, counteracting the abundance of jobs and the rise in incomes.
Spencer Platt via Getty Images

Stress and burnout stoke churn in health care workforce

Nov 10, 2021
The U.S. has nearly 400,000 fewer workers in nursing and residential-care facilities than it did before the pandemic.
Nurses Klivia Brahja, left, and Kelley Cabrera work in the emergency room at Jacobi Medical Center in the Bronx, New York. Many veteran nurses, Cabrera said, have retired or "they’ve gone to something easier, because this is just unmanageable.”
Courtesy Klivia Brahja

Good news in the latest jobs report: Wages are up, especially in low-paying sectors

Nov 5, 2021
The not-so-good news? Inflation has eaten up most of the gains.
While lower-wage service workers, like bar and restaurant employees, are seeing some of the highest wage growth, they're also the most vulnerable to cost-of-living increases.
Joe Raedle via Getty Images

The job market's turbulent – and likely to remain that way

Nov 5, 2021
Between COVID, shifting policy, and "The Big Quit", it's hard to get a handle on how the employment picture's changing.
In August, job growth fell by two-thirds to just about 360,000, and September was not even at 200,000. The nature of the job market has been difficult to forecast.
ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/AFP via Getty Images