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Mitchell Hartman

Senior Reporter

SHORT BIO

I am a staff reporter for Marketplace covering the economy, economic indicators, employment, labor and workforce.

What was your first job?

I had a job every summer during college running the receiving dock in a large sheet metal factory in North Jersey that made cans. My first job in journalism was as an editorial clerk at the Philadelphia Inquirer after graduating college in 1985.

What do you think is the hardest part of your job that no one knows?

Marketplace has among the tightest deadlines and the most demanding expectations for daily news stories of any national public radio newsroom IMHO.

What advice do you wish someone had given you before you started this career?

If you love your job, stick with it. If you're really good at something, keep doing it.

In your next life, what would your career be?

Bodhisattva (in the Mahayana Buddhist tradition, a being on the brink of enlightenment who could end the cycle of rebirth and gain nirvana but chooses to return out of compassion for other beings). Seriously, if I came back in a next life, it would confirm this teaching and I would care more about being in harmony with the universe than having another career. If I had to choose a career (and just be a bodhisattva on the side, I guess), I'd be a public radio reporter again.

Fill in the blank: Money can’t buy you happiness, but it can buy you ______.

Tickets.

What is something that everyone should own, no matter how much it costs?

Health insurance.

What’s something that you thought you knew but later found out you were wrong about?

Being a parent would constrain my choices and box me in. It did, but I didn't care.

What’s your most memorable Marketplace moment?

Emceeing a Sotheby's auction of literary memorabilia from the Beat Generation — I sold Jack Kerouac's last shot glass for high six figures. (As David Brancaccio was oft-required to say on air after segments like this: “It was a joke!”)

What’s the favorite item in your workspace and why?

Eve Epstein, my former editor and now office mate in the Marketplace Portland bureau at All Classical Portland.

Latest Stories (1,642)

Pandemic postponed major financial decisions for 2 in 5 Americans, survey finds

Apr 8, 2021
With more than 18 million still on unemployment, caution remains the watchword.
Many Americans remain cautious and have delayed personal milestones like getting married.
Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Biden administration rolls back some Medicaid work requirement waivers

Apr 8, 2021
The Trump administration had said states could require some people to prove they had work to get benefits.
President Biden at a White House press conference on April 6, 2021.
Alex Wong/Getty Images

Rural Washington confronts vaccine disparity for its Latinx workforce

Apr 7, 2021
Vaccination of ag workers and families in Yakima Valley is now picking up thanks in part to more doses flowing in.
The Latinx community is getting vaccinated at a slower rate than other Americans.
Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images

Job creation soars in March

Apr 2, 2021
Employers added 916,000 jobs in March and the unemployment rate fell to 6% as vaccination spreads and the economy reopens.
Jobs at restaurants, hotels and bars are among the more than 900,000 added across many industries.
Jeenah Moon/Getty Images

Weekly jobless claims are up, but other signs point to a recovering job market

Apr 1, 2021
The larger trend in jobless claims is down, while airline reservations and manufacturing work shifts are up.
Labor market indicators such as job postings and manufacturing work shifts have been improving.
Joe Raedle/Getty Images

How recipients will spend COVID relief payments depends on their income

Mar 26, 2021
The worst off are likely to use them to fend off economic disaster. The best off may well splurge.
Middle-income households may increase their spending a bit, and pay down debt. But Camilla Yanushevsky at CFRA Research said some of them may hold back, because they’re worried.
LPETTET via Getty Images

As state unemployment trust funds empty, employers face soaring taxes

Mar 24, 2021
States are scrambling to raise money — and changing their unemployment systems in other ways.
Owner Chris Knudson at Well 80 Brewhouse in Olympia, Washington. Knudson just started broadcasting Well 80’s weekly Tuesday Trivia Night live on the brewpub’s big-screen TVs for in-person diners, after holding the event virtually via Zoom for the past year during the pandemic.
Mitchell Hartman/Marketplace

Consumer confidence surges on relief payments

Mar 22, 2021
Morning Consult finds the American Rescue Plan boosted consumer confidence, with low- to middle-income Americans buoyed the most.
Optimism has increased since President Joe Biden signed the American Rescue Plan, which will likely lead to increased spending.
Samuel Corum/Getty Images

What's "full employment" for Yellen, Powell & Co.?

Mar 15, 2021
Treasury chief Yellen said the relief package may help the economy return to full employment in 2022. Officials are also concerned with other measures of financial hardship and inequality.
Unemployment is still high, but job creation is rebounding. Officials are also concerned about Americans' financial condition across race, gender and geography.
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

If you were on unemployment last year, you'll probably get a tax break

Mar 15, 2021
Under the American Relief Plan, some unemployment benefits are tax exempt.
Tim Boyle/Getty Images

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