Mar 28, 2017

03/28/17: The drop in a lucrative commodity: international students

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A drop in international students — who collectively add $31 billion to the U.S. economy — is met by colleges trying to assuage students whose holiday travel plans were put at risk by Trump's travel ban. Also, we take a look at how Americans spend their SNAP benefits and follow the increasing amounts of money U.S. airlines are investing in Chinese air travel.

Segments From this episode

Colleges try to reassure international students

Mar 28, 2017
Foreign applications drop amid fear and uncertainty over Trump policies.
Polina Kaniuka, 28, a graduate student from Ukraine, at an event aimed at reassuring international students at Indiana State University.
Drew Daudelin/Marketplace

Food stamp changes could limit grocery choices

Mar 28, 2017
The House Agriculture Subcommittee on Nutrition meets today to discuss the future of the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP, often referred to as food stamps. One change to the program being discussed would limit which foods recipients can buy with their benefits. Click the audio player above to hear the full story. Stories You […]

Executive order will discount the cost of carbon pollution

Mar 28, 2017
The White House says it will try to roll back a host of climate initiatives from the Obama administration. These are rules that apply to power plants and coal mines, for instance. But also look out for a sweeping attempt to undercut the government’s way of measuring climate pollution. Right now, federal agencies have to […]

Survivalist expos are drawing thousands

Mar 28, 2017
Prepper businesses have picked up after Trump's election. Self-reliance and fear are a few reasons why.
Customers check out survival gear, such as army backpacks, knives and freeze-dried food, at the National Preppers and Survivalists expo in Gonzales, Louisiana.
Tegan Wendland

03/28/17: Measuring the cost of climate change

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Mar 28, 2017
As climate change regulations are on the chopping block with President Donald Trump's impending executive order today, we discuss the legal case that could prevent him from completely dismantling the mechanisms that gauge the costs and benefits of pollution and conservation. Plus, navigating today's markets with Mark Luschini and stocking up on emergency supplies for the apocalypse at a Prepper convention in Louisiana.

A drop in international students — who collectively add $31 billion to the U.S. economy — is met by colleges trying to assuage students whose holiday travel plans were put at risk by Trump’s travel ban. Also, we take a look at how Americans spend their SNAP benefits and follow the increasing amounts of money U.S. airlines are investing in Chinese air travel.

The team

Stephen Ryan Producer, BBC