Race and Economy

For essential workers, curfews add new stress

Meghan McCarty Carino Jun 3, 2020
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Generally, people are allowed to break curfew to go to and from their jobs, but the disruptions of the last week have only added to stress. Bridget Bennett/AFP via Getty Images
Race and Economy

For essential workers, curfews add new stress

Meghan McCarty Carino Jun 3, 2020
Heard on:
Generally, people are allowed to break curfew to go to and from their jobs, but the disruptions of the last week have only added to stress. Bridget Bennett/AFP via Getty Images
HTML EMBED:
COPY

Many cities around the country have imposed curfews — orders that prohibit people from being out in public after anywhere from the late afternoon to 11 p.m.

Generally, people are allowed to go to and from their jobs, but the disruptions of the last week have only added to the stress for many essential workers who’ve already been dealing with worries about COVID-19.

For months now, nurse Andrea Leach has had to take extra precautions to do her job at a nursing home near Hazelton, Pennsylvania.

“It’s a struggle just to go into work because you need your temperature taken, you need to wear your PPE. It’s very uncomfortable,” Leach said.

Now she has an 8 p.m. curfew to worry about as well. She usually gets off work just an hour before.

“I need to get to the stores before these curfews. I have to make sure I’m back by eight o’clock,” Leach said.

Chris Torres heads to work the overnight shift at an aerospace parts manufacturing plant outside Los Angeles right after curfew hits. Now on top of keeping 6 feet from his coworkers, he’s worrying about his drive to work.

“If I was stopped by police, you know, what do I need to?” he asked. “Do I need to show correct documentation to show that I’m an essential worker?”

Some cities like Los Angeles, Chicago and Miami have also shut down public transportation during curfew hours, making it even more complicated for workers to get where they need to go.

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