Traffic at border crossings to Mexico slows to a crawl

Andy Uhler Apr 5, 2019
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Aerial view of cargo trucks lining up to cross to the United States near the US-Mexico border at Otay Mesa crossing port in Tijuana, Baja California state, Mexico, on April 4, 2019. US President Donald Trump is expected to visit a section of the border fence in Calexico during his tour to California on Friday. GUILLERMO ARIAS/AFP/Getty Images

Traffic at border crossings to Mexico slows to a crawl

Andy Uhler Apr 5, 2019
Aerial view of cargo trucks lining up to cross to the United States near the US-Mexico border at Otay Mesa crossing port in Tijuana, Baja California state, Mexico, on April 4, 2019. US President Donald Trump is expected to visit a section of the border fence in Calexico during his tour to California on Friday. GUILLERMO ARIAS/AFP/Getty Images
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While the border with Mexico remains open despite President Trump’s threats to close it, it’s now taking significantly longer to cross between the two countries. Lines of vehicles and waiting times have been growing at border crossings in El Paso, San Diego, and elsewhere. The delays are proving costly to businesses that depend on cross-border commerce. 

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