What consumers and other tech companies have against Apple’s App Store

Kai Ryssdal and Bennett Purser Jan 15, 2019
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This illustration picture taken on April 19, 2018 in Paris shows the tablet and smartphone app for the Apple Store. LIONEL BONAVENTURE/AFP/Getty Images

What consumers and other tech companies have against Apple’s App Store

Kai Ryssdal and Bennett Purser Jan 15, 2019
This illustration picture taken on April 19, 2018 in Paris shows the tablet and smartphone app for the Apple Store. LIONEL BONAVENTURE/AFP/Getty Images
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App sales from Google Play and Apple’s App Store are estimated to be a part of a $101 billion industry. Both companies make a profit by charging developers a 15-30 percent fee every time a consumer purchases an app, a model that has sparked criticism from companies like Netflix, Amazon and Spotify. A group of consumers also filed a lawsuit over the fees, saying Apple has a monopoly on the app market, driving up prices. Their argument was heard by the Supreme Court in November. Shira Ovide, a tech columnist for Bloomberg Opinion, spoke to Marketplace host Kai Ryssdal about the fate of Apple’s App Store and why the company is eager to keep collecting the fees.

Click the audio player above to hear the full interview.

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