Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Make Me Smart with Kai and Molly

Episode 123: Why even have a debt ceiling?

Jul 23, 2019

Latest Episodes

Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace

Deal or no deal

Jul 23, 2019
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Corner Office from Marketplace
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report

SNL brings in highest ratings in over 20 years

Amy Scott Feb 10, 2017
Share Now on:
HTML EMBED:
COPY
Melissa McCarthy as press secretary Sean Spicer in last week's episode of Saturday Night Live.
NBC Universal

Alec Baldwin is scheduled to host “Saturday Night Live” this weekend for a record 17th time. The actor’s frequent role impersonating President Donald Trump on the show has won Baldwin new fans and drawn the ire of Trump himself.

The post-election political climate has meant big business for “Saturday Night Live.” According to NBC, the show’s ratings are the highest in more than 20 years. Viewership is up 22 percent from this time last season to 10.6 million viewers.

“’Saturday Night Live’ has always flourished when it has great targets to satirize,” said Jonathan Taplin, director emeritus of the USC Annenberg Innovation Lab.

Think Chevy Chase playing Gerald Ford, or Dana Carvey as the first President Bush.

Only now, NBC can serve up short clips on social media as well, like Melissa McCarthy’s star turn as White House press secretary Sean Spicer from last Saturday’s episode.

NBC makes money selling ads at the beginning of some of those clips, said media analyst James Dix at Wedbush Securities, and those clips also drive more viewers to watch the show. Higher TV ratings also allow the network to charge more for spots.

“You can go out and say, ‘Hey, I’ve got more eyeballs,’” Dix said. “Advertisers pay by eyeball, and they make more money.”

Ratings are up at the conservative-leaning Fox News as well, Dix pointed out.

“It’s interesting to see how polarization can be profitable,” he said. 

If you’re a member of your local public radio station, we thank you — because your support helps those stations keep programs like Marketplace on the air.  But for Marketplace to continue to grow, we need additional investment from those who care most about what we do: superfans like you.

Your donation — as little as $5 — helps us create more content that matters to you and your community, and to reach more people where they are – whether that’s radio, podcasts or online.

When you contribute directly to Marketplace, you become a partner in that mission: someone who understands that when we all get smarter, everybody wins.