Claim your bonus gift: give any amount to get 4 KaiPA coasters! Donate today
 Children of the Mangyongdae Schoolchildren's Palace attending extra facultative computer class after school on Oct. 18, 2007 in Pyongyang, North Korea. Photo by Alexander Hassenstein/Getty Images

North Korea has 28 websites

Kai Ryssdal Sep 22, 2016
 Children of the Mangyongdae Schoolchildren's Palace attending extra facultative computer class after school on Oct. 18, 2007 in Pyongyang, North Korea. Photo by Alexander Hassenstein/Getty Images

We’ve been talking today about the big Yahoo hack affecting a half-billion users.

A hack like this would never happen in North Korea — besides the whole “totalitarian state” thing, we learned this week that the country effectively has 28 websites. For perspective, there are 140 million .com and .net sites.

Somebody in Pyongyang accidentally made the list of sites with its top-level domain, .kp, public. That let the folks at MotherboardHacker News and elsewhere see the full list, and do some poking around.

Not all 28 sites were visible — possibly because of the crush of traffic, Motherboard noted — but most of it seemed pretty basic. There’s an airline, a college and a state-sponsored news site. There are also a few clones of sites that are banned in the country, like Yahoo and a social network — a different Facebook clone than the one “hackers” discovered back in May. Apparently there’s even a clone of a movie pirating site.

If none of those links work for you, Gizmodo has screenshots from those sites and many —well, a few — more.

As a nonprofit news organization, our future depends on listeners like you who believe in the power of public service journalism.

Your investment in Marketplace helps us remain paywall-free and ensures everyone has access to trustworthy, unbiased news and information, regardless of their ability to pay.

Donate today — in any amount — to become a Marketplace Investor. Now more than ever, your commitment makes a difference.