Final Note

It was very easy to hack North Korea’s Facebook clone

Kai Ryssdal May 31, 2016
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North Korean children learn to use the computer in a primary school on April 2, 2011 in Pyongyang, North Korea.  Feng Li/Getty Images
Final Note

It was very easy to hack North Korea’s Facebook clone

Kai Ryssdal May 31, 2016
North Korean children learn to use the computer in a primary school on April 2, 2011 in Pyongyang, North Korea.  Feng Li/Getty Images
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You know how conventional wisdom — and the U.S. government — has it that North Korea was behind the huge hack of Sony Pictures a year and a half ago?

A pause here for reconsideration, if I might.

There were reports last week that North Korea had set up a Facebook clone — necessary because of course the real thing is banned there.

But it turns out a college student from Scotland was able to hack it because the administrator’s password was “password.”

Guys, don’t do that.

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