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Krissy Clark is the senior reporter for Marketplace’s Wealth & Poverty Desk, where she helps make sense of some of the most fundamental shifts happening in the U.S. economy, including the growth of the low-wage service sector and the shrinking of middle-wage, middle-class jobs. Clark tracks the widening gap between rich and poor in the U.S. and what it means for economic mobility in America.

Some of Clark’s favorite stories involve getting people from different parts of the economy to talk to each other. She has prompted conversations between a Silicon Valley CEO and a worker whose job he wanted to automate, brought two economists who disagreed about the effects of raising the minimum wage to Taco Bell for a debate, and set up a virtual “confessional booth” for people to reveal their financial safety nets. Clark’s reporting has taken her to abandoned factories in Flint, Michigan; the post-tornado ruins of Moore, Oklahoma; and the epicenter of the foreclosure crisis in Las Vegas, Nevada.

Before joining Marketplace, Clark was the LA Bureau Chief for KQED public radio’s California Report. She has been a regular contributor to NPR's Morning Edition and All Things Considered, BBC Radio, Freakonomics and StoryCorps.

Clark’s stories and documentaries have won awards from Scripps-Howard, PRNDI, NFCB, an Investigative Reporters and Editors Medal of Honor, and First Prize in Investigative Reporting from the National Awards for Education Reporting. Clark was a finalist for the Livingston Award for Journalists Under 35, and a finalist for a Third Coast Award for Best News Feature.

Clark is a frequent public speaker and has given talks at Google, Stanford University, the University of Kansas, Web 2.0, the Conference on World Affairs, and the Aspen Institute.

In 2009, Clark won a Knight Journalism Fellowship at Stanford to spend a year experimenting with location-aware technologies as tools for story-telling. She is the founder of Storieseverywhere.org, a location-based, trans-media storytelling project whose audio installations have been exhibited by The New Museum in NYC and San Francisco’s Gray Area Foundation for the Arts.

Clark graduated cum laude from Yale University with a B.A. in The Humanities. She grew up in the San Francisco Bay Area and likes to read maps.

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Features by Krissy Clark

Part II: 'Save money, live better'

As real wages continue to decline, the food stamp economy keeps booming.
Posted In: food stamps, Walmart, SNAP
Walmart in Cleveland

Part I: The secret life of a food stamp

The biggest winners of the SNAP economy are the ones the government won’t tell you about.
Posted In: Walmart, SNAP, food stamps

Starting over with a startup: When is it time to stop?

In Silicon Valley, a failed start-up is often considered to be a helpful lesson in how to succeed - next time.
Posted In: startups, Silicon Valley

'A movie star for a year, and now you’re roofing houses'

An interview with David Good, the co-founder of a start-up called GameCrush that was the target of much press and much investment.
Posted In: startups

Your start-up failed. Congratulations!

Silicon Valley's embrace of failure as a step toward success can be confusing -- especially if you're the venture capitalist that put up the money.
Posted In: Silicon Valley, start-up, failure

Failing in order to succeed? There's a conference for that

FailCon is an annual event in San Francisco for the Silicon Valley crowd, who've taken to heart the notion that failing teaches us how to get it right the next time.
Posted In: Tech, Silicon Valley, Failcon

The roots -- and some results -- of the charitable tax deduction

The tax break for charitable deductions reflects American attitudes about government, and about the best way to help others.
Posted In: tax, deduction, philanthropy

Mandela ended political apartheid in South Africa, but economic apartheid continues

South Africa is one of the most unequal countries in the world in terms of income distribution, and the differences often fall along racial lines.
Posted In: Nelson Mandela, South Africa, apartheid

As fast food workers go on strike, Obama argues for increasing minimum wage

Fast food workers across America are striking today, asking for $15 an hour. Their employers may not be sympathetic to their cause, but they have a friend in the White House.
Posted In: fast food, minimum wage, living wage

'Volcker Rule' to finally be a rule

U.S. regulators have announced that, after years of wrangling, on December 10 they are finally set to finalize the details of the so-called Volcker Rule.
Posted In: Volcker Rule, Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act

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