Elon Musk reaches $44 billion buyout deal with Twitter, aims to privatize the company

Apr 25, 2022
Elon Musk said he wanted to own and privatize Twitter because he thinks it’s not living up to its potential as a platform for free speech.
Twitter said the transaction was unanimously approved by its board of directors and is expected to close in 2022.
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Speech on the internet: The First Amendment and Section 230 are different

Jan 14, 2021
Private parties can decide whose speech they want to distribute. That's a First Amendment right, not a Section 230 right.
Twitter permanently suspended President Trump's account, citing the risk of further incitement of violence.
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What role should governments play in regulating speech online?

Aug 24, 2018
"Many people ... trust these big tech companies frankly more than they do their politicians," Politico's chief technology correspondent says.
GREG BAKER/AFP/Getty Images

Congress begins work to overhaul higher education regulations

Dec 12, 2017
There’s a lot at stake for students, taxpayers and colleges.

The Supreme Court rejects rule banning offensive trademarks

Jun 20, 2017
SCOTUS says it is unconstitutional to reject trademarks because they use offensive terms like racial slurs.
A view of the U.S. Supreme Court.
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Twitter tries to tread a fine line

by
Jul 20, 2016
Twitter's high-profile spat over speech highlights the gap between ideals, reality
Twitter has provided a platform for movements such as the Arab Spring, but it also leaves room for hate-filled comments. 
MOHAMMED AL-SHAIKH/AFP/Getty Images

'Liking' something on Facebook is now protected by the First Amendment

Sep 19, 2013
Now when you 'like' something on Facebook, you're exercising your First Amendment rights.

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Who do you trust more with your free speech: The government or tech companies?

May 6, 2013
A secret meeting, a handful of tech CEO's, and the future of your freedom of speech online.

Law against panhandling ruled too harsh

Sep 28, 2012
An Arcata, California ordinance did not allow non-aggressive requests for money, including signs, in many parts of town. But that all changed when a judge ruled the mandate unconstitutional.