May 12, 2021

Is inflation just couch surfing? Or is it moving in for real?

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Consumer prices are up again, but some economists still see this as temporary and having to do with an economy trying to recover. Plus, what methods government officials are trying to use to combat fuel shortages. Also, a legal victory for Amazon over a big European tax bill. And, a Kurdish market in Nashville damaged by severe flooding is able to reopen in time to serve its community during Ramadan.

Segments From this episode

Here's some context for the large increases in consumer prices

The year-over-year reading on consumer prices shows a 4.2% increase. That's the highest since 2008. However, that's compared to April 2020 and its plunging prices at the start of the pandemic. "That annual number is distorted because we were in a pandemic," said Susan Schmidt, head of U.S. equities at Aviva Investors. "People weren't going out. Everything was shutting down. Costs were of course dropping. And so when you look at that in comparison, you're going to get a large number. Markets expected that coming into today, and that's why you're not seeing a huge move in the market this morning." Schmidt says that for the next several months, investors will be focused on whether or not this type of increase is just a blip. "Is this inflation? Or is this just a year-over-year sign that the economy is getting back to normal? And that debate is going to rage on in the coming months. We're not going to know for sure, really, until we get to the fall."

Colonial Pipeline shutdown prompts federal, state action to move fuel

May 12, 2021
Georgia, for example, has increased the amount of weight trucks are allowed to carry on its roads and bridges.
The pipeline network carries 2.5 million barrels of fuel a day from the Gulf Coast all up along the East Coast.
Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

A flood-damaged Kurdish market begins to recover with community support

May 12, 2021
Nashville's Botan Market reopened in time to serve its community during Ramadan.
Botan Market in Nashville, Tennessee, suffered more than $300,000 in inventory damage during recent flooding.
Alexis Marshall/WPLN News

Music from the episode

Bloodless Andrew Bird

The team

Nicole Childers Executive Producer
Victoria Craig Producer, BBC
Stephen Ryan Producer, BBC
Jonathan Frewin Producer, BBC
Daniel Shin Producer
Jay Siebold Engineer
Brian Allison Engineer
Alex Schroeder Digital producer
Meredith Garretson Producer
Erika Soderstrom Producer/Director