Parenting in a Pandemic

President Trump pushes officials to reopen up schools this fall

Sabri Ben-Achour, Kimberly Adams, and Alex Schroeder Jul 8, 2020
Heard on: Marketplace Morning Report
HTML EMBED:
COPY
The decision of whether to keep schools and universities open during the pandemic has been mostly a local decision up to this point. Michael Loccisano/Getty Images
Parenting in a Pandemic

President Trump pushes officials to reopen up schools this fall

Sabri Ben-Achour, Kimberly Adams, and Alex Schroeder Jul 8, 2020
The decision of whether to keep schools and universities open during the pandemic has been mostly a local decision up to this point. Michael Loccisano/Getty Images
HTML EMBED:
COPY

President Donald Trump kicked off a new pressure campaign Tuesday to convince state and local officials to open schools back up in the fall.

On Wednesday, Trump in a series of tweets threatened to withhold federal funds from schools that don’t reopen and lashed out at the CDC over guidelines for reopening.

The decision of whether to keep schools and universities open during the pandemic has been mostly a local decision up to this point, and how to reopen them safely is still something education and health officials are sorting out.

Marketplace’s Kimberly Adams has more on this. The following is an edited transcript of her conversation with Marketplace’s Sabri Ben-Achour.

Sabri Ben-Achour: Kimberly, what’s behind the Trump administration’s push here?

Kimberly Adams: The main argument is that it’s worse for kids to stay at home and stick to remote learning when compared to the overall risk of them getting very sick or even dying from diseases caused by COVID-19. The American Academy of Pediatrics, which joined Trump’s announcement Tuesday, is also warning about what this is doing to kids’ mental health an social skills, to be out of school for so long. There’s also the economic argument that as long as kids can’t go to school, it’s going to be hard, if not impossible, for caregivers to go back to work, and that will be a continuing drag on any economic recovery

Ben-Achour: With sharp increases in COVID-19 cases across the country, there is clearly a health risk if schools open too early, but what are the costs associated with returning kids to school and young adults to colleges?

Adams: I spoke earlier today with Lily Eskelsen García, president of the National Education Association. She said between the extra teachers and nurses needed to have good social distancing, plus money for PPE, disinfectants and remote learning support, schools across the country need an extra $200 billion to safely reopen:

“We can’t do this out of the pockets of underpaid teachers, at a time, by the way, when school budgets are being slashed because our revenue source, the tax dollars, the tax base, has fallen off a cliff.”

Eskelsen García is frustrated by President Trump’s push to reopen partly because right now there’s not money attached to it.

Ben-Achour: What’s been the response to this push so far?

Adams: President Trump does have some health and education officials backing him up and saying the social and educational need for kids to be physically in school outweighs the risks. But several teachers groups and other health experts warn it’s too risky for students and teachers before there are better plans in place.

COVID-19 Economy FAQs

What’s going on with extra COVID-19 unemployment benefits?

It’s been weeks since President Donald Trump signed an executive memorandum that was supposed to get the federal government back into the business of topping up unemployment benefits, to $400 a week. Few states, however, are currently paying even part of the benefit that the president promised. And, it looks like, in most states, the maximum additional benefit unemployment recipients will be able to get is $300.

What’s the latest on evictions?

For millions of Americans, things are looking grim. Unemployment is high, and pandemic eviction moratoriums have expired in states across the country. And as many people already know, eviction is something that can haunt a person’s life for years. For instance, getting evicted can make it hard to rent again. And that can lead to spiraling poverty.

Which retailers are requiring that people wear masks when shopping? And how are they enforcing those rules?

Walmart, Target, Lowe’s, CVS, Home Depot, Costco — they all have policies that say shoppers are required to wear a mask. When an employee confronts a customer who refuses, the interaction can spin out of control, so many of these retailers are telling their workers to not enforce these mandates. But, just having them will actually get more people to wear masks.

You can find answers to more questions on unemployment benefits and COVID-19 here.

Read More

Collapse

As a nonprofit news organization, our future depends on listeners like you who believe in the power of public service journalism.

Your investment in Marketplace helps us remain paywall-free and ensures everyone has access to trustworthy, unbiased news and information, regardless of their ability to pay.

Donate today — in any amount — to become a Marketplace Investor. Now more than ever, your commitment makes a difference.

Raise a glass to Marketplace!

Just $7/month gets you a limited edition KaiPA pint glass. Plus bragging rights that you support independent journalism.
Donate today to get yours!