COVID-19

Depleted sales tax revenue means states have to cut budgets

Andy Uhler Jun 4, 2020
Heard on: Marketplace
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A bar boarded up in Austin, Texas, in May. Texas is one of seven states without an income tax, so it relies more heavily on sales taxes. Tom Pennington/Getty Images
COVID-19

Depleted sales tax revenue means states have to cut budgets

Andy Uhler Jun 4, 2020
A bar boarded up in Austin, Texas, in May. Texas is one of seven states without an income tax, so it relies more heavily on sales taxes. Tom Pennington/Getty Images
HTML EMBED:
COPY

With consumer spending down a record 13.6% in April and another 1.9 million unemployment claims last week, states are collecting less money in taxes.

Texas, for example, collected a whopping 13% less in sales taxes last month than it did in May of 2019.

Revenues are way down, there’s no question about it,” said Michael Granof, an accounting professor at the University of Texas at Austin. “They have to cut somewhere. Well, what do they spend their money on?”

Public education for one thing. That’s the state’s biggest expense.

Cal Jillson, professor of political science at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, said Texas is already near the bottom in per capita spending on education, and cuts will bring long-lasting economic pain.

“Everybody understands that education is preparation for the workforce, so Texas is truly between a rock and a hard place, and it’s likely worse than that,” he said.

Texas will also have to reduce health care spending, another big budget item. And things like highway maintenance will be delayed, too.

“We are going to cut to balance and then hope that we can replace those revenues in the coming years without doing irreparable damage,” Jillson said.

Texas is one of seven states without an income tax, which means it relies on sales taxes more than other states, like California or New York. But right now, all states are in the same boat.

“You pray that the federal government is going to step up to the plate and provide some relief soon,” said Michael Leachman, vice president for state fiscal policy at the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities. “You can also draw on your reserves. Besides those things, you don’t have good options.”

The federal government has tried to help state and local governments as part of the different COVID-19 relief packages, but most are going to need a lot more cash before revenue collection picks up again.

COVID-19 Economy FAQs

What’s the latest on the extra COVID-19 unemployment benefits?

As of now, those $600-a-week payments will stop at the end of July. For many, unemployment payments have been a lifeline, but one that is about to end, if nothing changes. The debate over whether or not to extend these benefits continues among lawmakers.

With a spike in the number of COVID-19 cases, are restaurants and bars shutting back down?

The latest jobs report shows that 4.8 million Americans went back to work in June. More than 30% of those job gains were from bars and restaurants. But those industries are in trouble again. For example, because of the steep rise in COVID-19 cases in Texas, Gov. Greg Abbott, a Republican, increased restrictions on restaurant capacities and closed bars. It’s created a logistical nightmare.

Which businesses got Paycheck Protection Program loans?

The numbers are in — well, at least in part. The federal government has released the names of companies that received loans of $150,000 or more through the Paycheck Protection Program.

Some of the companies people are surprised got loans include Kanye West’s fashion line, Yeezy, TGI Fridays and P.F. Chang’s. The companies you might not recognize, particularly some smaller businesses, were able to hire back staff or partially reopen thanks to the loans.

You can find answers to more questions on unemployment benefits and COVID-19 here.

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