After the grounding of its 737 planes, can Boeing’s messaging convince flyers?

Kai Ryssdal, Sean McHenry, and Liz Sanchez Mar 14, 2019
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A LEAP engine is pictured on the first Boeing 737 MAX airliner is pictured at the company's manufacturing plant, on Dec. 8, 2015, in Renton, Washington. Stephen Brashear/Getty Images

After the grounding of its 737 planes, can Boeing’s messaging convince flyers?

Kai Ryssdal, Sean McHenry, and Liz Sanchez Mar 14, 2019
A LEAP engine is pictured on the first Boeing 737 MAX airliner is pictured at the company's manufacturing plant, on Dec. 8, 2015, in Renton, Washington. Stephen Brashear/Getty Images
HTML EMBED:
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Boeing faces a tough public relations challenge in the coming months, following two crashes and the grounding of its 737 planes. The question is, how will the company control the messaging to the air-faring public? Marketplace host Kai Ryssdal spoke to Felicia Miller, professor of marketing at Marquette University, about the company’s PR strategy.

Click the audio player above to hear the full interview.

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