As a candidate, Donald Trump promised he'd bring change to Washington in his first 100 days in office.
As a candidate, Donald Trump promised he'd bring change to Washington in his first 100 days in office. - 

President Donald Trump has a lot to say about what he’s done for the economy. But what has he actually accomplished in his first year in office?

During the presidential campaign, Trump made a series of promises to voters that he said would restore “honesty and accountability” and bring change to Washington. We’ve taken his economic promises related to infrastructure and looked into whether or not he’s kept them. Do you think he has? Give us your best answer and see if others agree with you.

  • Promise 1: "Leverages public-private partnerships, and private investments through tax incentives, to spur $1 trillion in infrastructure investment over ten years. It is revenue neutral."

    Do you think he kept his promise?
    Yes
    No
    Not sure

    Here’s how everyone answered:

    Yes
    No
    Not sure

    12.2%

    76.9%

    10.9%

    There’s no plan for this yet.

    There’s no plan for this yet.

    Well, let’s break it down.

    While a detailed infrastructure plan has yet to materialize, Trump noted in his State of the Union speech on Jan. 30 that he is calling on Congress “to produce a bill that generates at least $1.5 trillion for the new infrastructure investment we need." According to a broad outline of the plan released by the White House, that figure is made up of $200 billion in federal funds, with the remaining $1.3 trillion coming from cities, states and private companies, though the plan did not detail how these funds would be generated. While Trump campaigned on the idea of leveraging public-private partnerships for the bulk of investment, he took a subdued view during his speech, noting that "Every Federal dollar should be leveraged by partnering with state and local governments and, where appropriate, tapping into private sector investment — to permanently fix the infrastructure deficit."

  • Promise 2: "Cancel billions in payments to U.N. climate change programs and use the money to fix America’s water and environmental infrastructure."

    Do you think he kept his promise?
    Yes
    No
    Not sure

    Here’s how everyone answered:

    Yes
    No
    Not sure

    15.9%

    73.2%

    10.9%

    While the president did “cancel” payments, it’s hard to say where that money will end up.

    While the president did “cancel” payments, it’s hard to say where that money will end up.

    Well, let’s break it down.

    The president has said the country is spending “more than its fair share” at the United Nations, and his budget plan, released in March 2017, would cut U.S. funding to U.N. climate change programs. On June 1, Trump vowed that the U.S. would pull out of the Paris climate agreement, however the earliest that the U.S. can withdraw from the deal is in November 2020 - exactly one day after the next presidential election. Trump also declared that the U.S. wouldn’t pay the remaining $2 billion of a $3 billion pledge to the U.N.’s Green Climate Fund, which helps poor countries reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Then in December, United Nations Ambassador Nikki Haley announced that the U.S. was cutting its U.N. budget for 2018 by $285 million. As of now, it is unclear whether that money will be used to fix America’s water and environmental infrastructure. The infrastructure plan released by the White House on January 30 does not go into detail about the funds allocated to these issues. And while the president’s budget did call for some funds to be spent on water infrastructure programs, the U.S. Congress has yet to consider it.

  • Promise 3: "Lift the Obama-Clinton roadblocks and allow vital energy infrastructure projects, like the Keystone Pipeline, to move forward."

    Do you think he kept his promise?
    Yes
    No
    Not sure

    Here’s how everyone answered:

    Yes
    No
    Not sure

    55.0%

    29.5%

    15.5%

    He reversed the Obama administration decision that halted the construction.

    He reversed the Obama administration decision that halted the construction.

    Well, let’s break it down then.

    Four days after his inauguration, Trump signed a memo letting construction move forward on the proposed $8 billion pipeline that would stretch more than a thousand miles from Canada to Nebraska and in March, Trump issued a permit to TransCanada, the Keystone project developer. The project continued to face delays at the state level, but the company said in January that it was moving forward with the project.

  • Bonus question: Are any of these promises actually good for our economy?
    Yes
    No
    Not sure

    Here’s how everyone answered:

    Yes
    No
    Not sure

    25.4%

    56.5%

    18.1%

    That depends on whom you ask.

Take the quiz

Credit: Carrie Barber, Paul Brent, Jana Kasperkevic, Sarah Moughty, Olga Oksman, Brian Ronaghan, Mark Salay, Arjuna Soriano, Donna Tam.

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