What could happen to jobs and labor in 2013

Mitchell Hartman Dec 28, 2012
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What could happen to jobs and labor in 2013

Mitchell Hartman Dec 28, 2012
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A lot of attention will be paid to the job market in 2013. But to fully understand where it’s headed, we must first look back at the year that has just passed.

It was a notable — and challenging — year for organized labor, especially in light of the recent right-to-work law enacted in Michigan. But anti-union forces aren’t entirely sweeping the table. Michigan remains a watershed state for the labor movement.

“The effort in Michigan will provide more incentive for working people and the union movement to challenge any additional attacks in other states,” says Maurice Emsellem at the National Employment Law Project. Still, he adds, “it’s going to be a constant challenge, the challenge is not going to go away.”

Related labor issues — like school teacher tenure — could also come to the forefront in 2013.

Meanwhile, the unemployment rate current rests at 7.7 percent — a big improvement from late 2009 when it was up at 10 percent. But will the job market continue to improve next year?

There is some speculation the rate could continue to drop, although perhaps not significantly. That’s because more people are likely to reenter the job market as they see steady job creation.

 

 

 

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