Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy

Latest Episodes

Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Make Me Smart with Kai and Molly
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Tech

GOP leader open to tax cut compromise

Nancy Marshall-Genzer Sep 13, 2010
Share Now on:
HTML EMBED:
COPY

TEXT OF STORY

BILL RADKE: The top Republican in the U.S. House surprised Democrats yesterday by saying he’d be open to a compromise on taxes. Congress is trying to figure out what to do about tax cuts enacted in the Bush administration that are due to expire at the end of this year.

Marketplace’s Nancy Marshall Genzer joins us now, live from Washington. Good morning, Nancy.

NANCY MARSHALL GENZER: Good morning, Bill.

RADKE: What did House Republican leader John Boehner say?

MARSHALL GENZER: He said he would be open to a compromise, which was unexpected. Until now, there’s been a lot of contention between Republicans and Democrats on this issue. Republicans say all tax cuts in a tough economy are good, even for the rich.

RADKE: How many people are we talking about here?

MARSHALL GENZER: Well, not you and me Bill, that’s for sure. We’re talking about 3 percent of the population not getting a tax break — the very rich. Families making less than $250,000 would get the tax cut. That’s who Boehner was talking about yesterday, when he spoke on CBS’s “Face the Nation.”

REP. JOHN BOEHNER: If the only option I have is to vote for those at $250,000 and below, of course I’m going to do that. But I’m going to do everything I can to fight to ensure that we extend the current tax rates for all Americans.

Now, the federal government would save about $700 billion if the tax breaks for the rich were eliminated.

RADKE: OK, so Nancy, John Boehner appears willing to compromise, as you say. But he’s still going to need support from other Republicans. How do they feel?

MARSHALL GENZER: It’s not clear yet. Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell hasn’t issued any statement on Boehner’s remarks.

RADKE: OK. Marketplace’s Nancy Marshall Genzer joining us from Washington, D.C. Thank you, Nancy.

MARSHALL GENZER: You’re welcome.

If you’re a member of your local public radio station, we thank you — because your support helps those stations keep programs like Marketplace on the air.  But for Marketplace to continue to grow, we need additional investment from those who care most about what we do: superfans like you.

Your donation — as little as $5 — helps us create more content that matters to you and your community, and to reach more people where they are – whether that’s radio, podcasts or online.

When you contribute directly to Marketplace, you become a partner in that mission: someone who understands that when we all get smarter, everybody wins.

We’re counting on you today!

Marketplace helps you stay financially responsible all year, now we need YOUR help to keep our budget on track.
Donate NOW to help us hit our target of 2,500 Marketplace Investors by June 30!