Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy

Latest Episodes

Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
This Is Uncomfortable
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report
Download
HTML Embed
HTML EMBED
Click to Copy
Marketplace Morning Report

The Internet address goes global

Marketplace Staff Oct 29, 2009
Share Now on:
HTML EMBED:
COPY

TEXT OF STORY

Bill Radke: The Internet address goes global. The company that acts as the world’s clearinghouse for Internet domains is a California-based non-profit called ICANN. Reporter Kurt Achin says ICANN is about to help the Web speak the local language around the world.


Kurt Achin: Up until now, Internet users have had to type out web page URLs using the Roman alphabet.

But on Friday, ICANN’s board — meeting here in Seoul — is expected to change all that, when it votes to introduce what’s called “Internationalized Domain Names.” Within a year or two, Web users will be able to type out their favorite Web addresses using Chinese characters, Korean hangeul, Arabic script, and so on.

Rebecca MACKINNON: The Internet is no longer dominated by English speakers anymore.

Rebecca Mackinnon is a Hong Kong University professor specializing in Internet governance. She says about one and a half billion people now use the Internet. Most are university graduates who are comfortable with the Roman alphabet. But the world’s next online generation looks a little different.

MACKINNON: Really the next billion Internet users are increasingly going to be peasant farmers in far western China, who maybe didn’t graduate from grade school.

Friday’s vote is expected to create a boom for companies that register domain names — as well as a lot of legal headaches in deciding who has the right to register certain addresses.

In Seoul, I’m Kurt Achin for Marketplace.

If you’re a member of your local public radio station, we thank you — because your support helps those stations keep programs like Marketplace on the air.  But for Marketplace to continue to grow, we need additional investment from those who care most about what we do: superfans like you.

Your donation — as little as $5 — helps us create more content that matters to you and your community, and to reach more people where they are – whether that’s radio, podcasts or online.

When you contribute directly to Marketplace, you become a partner in that mission: someone who understands that when we all get smarter, everybody wins.