How do consumer products companies decide how much they'll raise their prices?

Oct 20, 2022
It depends on the ingredients that go into a product and how much competition it faces.
Consumer products companies like Procter & Gamble and Nestle have recently raised prices on some items rather than a blanket price increase.
Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

Why people food companies are buying pet food companies

May 2, 2019
General Mills last year bought Blue Buffalo Pet Products for $8 billion.
Chalabala/iStock/Getty Images Plus

The war behind grocery store shelves

Dec 12, 2016
Manufacturers pay steep fees to get their products on grocery store shelves, which can eliminate smaller companies from entering the market.
A worker places various household items on the shelf at a supermarket in Beijing 12 September 2005. China's consumer inflation rate slowed in August, with prices rising just 1.3 percent from a year earlier compared with an increase of 1.8 percent in July, while in August last year, inflation was running at 5.3 percent year-on-year, sparking fears the economy was beginning to get out of hand.
STR/AFP/Getty Images

Product placement: An ad you can't skip

Sep 11, 2015
At least the more subtle 'brand integration' won't make you groan ... or will it?

Selling a product that never has to be replaced

Apr 3, 2015
How to make products that last forever and still turn a profit.

Product placement lessons from 'The Walking Dead'

Oct 22, 2014
It’s no longer enough to just place a brand into a storyline.

The pollutants in your face wash

Feb 12, 2014
Groups say pieces of plastic -- called microbeads -- end up in our waterways

For public good, not for profit.

Cascade Platinum: Turning household goods into gold

Sep 6, 2013
Consumer products companies are offering customers upscale versions of everyday household goods -- things like embossed paper towels.

Need some Econ 101?

Our new Marketplace Crash Course is here to help. Sign-up for free, learn at your own pace.