Nov 2, 2009

Marketplace for Monday, November 2, 2009

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Marketplace for Monday, November 2, 2009

Segments From this episode

Too bad shareholders aren't pay czars

Nov 2, 2009
Many people are furious over the rich pay packages enjoyed by corporate executives. But some are also upset that the government has capped pay for some of them. Commentator Susan Lee says the pay czar is doing what shareholders should be able to do.

Terminator franchise up for auction

Nov 2, 2009
The company that bought the rights to the "Terminator" film franchise just two years ago is bankrupt. So it's auctioning off those rights. Is anyone still interested? Stacey Vanek-Smith reports.
A still from "Terminator Salvation"
collider.com

How Ford got its profit margin back

Nov 2, 2009
Ford Motor Co. says it earned almost a billion dollars in the third quarter -- a big profit considering it lost more than $150 million this time last year. Alisa Roth reports on how the company did it.

How health care exchanges would work

Nov 2, 2009
Under the current health care bills in Congress, people not insured through an employer could shop for coverage in health insurance exchanges. Joel Rose explains how the exchanges would work in our latest installment of "The Cure."

CIT will work through reorganization

Nov 2, 2009
Despite a $2 billion bailout from Washington last year, CIT Group has succumbed to Chapter 11 bankruptcy. Mitchell Hartman reports.

Goldman wants tax credits at its price

Nov 2, 2009
Goldman Sachs is looking for a way to slim down its tax bill, and it's considering buying unused tax credits from Fannie Mae. But it doesn't want to pay full price, so taxpayers would make up the difference. Steve Henn reports.

Emotions play a part in biz decisions

Nov 2, 2009
A bad day at home or a bad impression can lead to emotionally-influenced decisions at work and in business. Behavioral economist Dan Ariely explains feelings, nothing more than feelings, to host Kai Ryssdal.

Bloomberg's wallet hurting his image?

Nov 2, 2009
New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg is widely expected to win a third term in Tuesday's election. So why will he have spent as much as $140 million on the race? Jeremy Hobson reports.